Ch 9: Compass Writing Test: Sentence Structure

About This Chapter

Follow along with video lessons that show how to properly structure your sentences. The concepts you learn here by watching video lessons and taking short quizzes can prepare you for the ACT Compass Writing Essay Test.

Compass Writing Test: Sentence Structure - Chapter Summary

Watch video lessons to discover how the different parts of a sentence come together in a logical fashion so that you can compose strong, well-written sentences in the Compass Writing Essay Test. Each lesson focuses on a particular skill that you can use to enhance your writing in preparation for the test, such as:

  • Mastering subject-verb agreement
  • Using pronouns, nouns, and conjunctions properly
  • Writing logical sentences and properly identifying ownership
  • Using who, whom, whose and who's properly
  • Knowing the difference between dependent and independent clauses
  • Varying sentence structure to enhance your writing
  • Identifying the subject of a sentence
  • Differentiating between direct and indirect objects

Our instructors will guide you through each of these concepts so that you can fully prepare yourself to skillfully create sentences in your essay when taking the exam. The videos are engaging and easy to understand, which allows you to have fun while studying for your Compass Writing Essay Test.

Objectives of the Compass Writing Test: Sentence Structure Chapter

The Compass Writing Essay Test assesses your writing abilities in order to place you in the English courses that will best meet your skills and needs. Each lesson in this chapter addresses a topic relating to sentence structure, which will aid in preparing you to write an engaging and fluid essay on the exam. You can also use the quizzes throughout this chapter to get a clear idea of what you might expect to see on the real test.

The exam will require you to write an essay based on the prompt that's provided. Writing sentences that are structured well will help you create a strong, clearly-focused essay.

17 Lessons in Chapter 9: Compass Writing Test: Sentence Structure
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

1. Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

Just because you know a good sentence when you read one doesn't mean that you think it's easy to put one together - forget about writing an essay's worth. Learn how to write clear sentences and turn rough ones into gems.

Varied Sentence Structure in Writing

2. Varied Sentence Structure in Writing

Learn the meaning of sentence structure and the importance of varying sentence structure in writing in this lesson. Four strategies to help you vary your sentence structure will also be described.

Independent & Dependent Clauses: Subordination & Coordination

3. Independent & Dependent Clauses: Subordination & Coordination

This lesson is about independent and dependent clauses, and how they make up a sentence. Dependent clauses, like the name suggests, rely on other elements in a sentence. Independent clauses, on the other hand, can stand alone. Learn more in this lesson.

How to Identify the Subject of a Sentence

4. How to Identify the Subject of a Sentence

Don't pass over this lesson! You may think you know how to find subjects and verbs in a sentence, but picking them out can be harder than you think. Identifying subjects and verbs is the first step to unlocking nearly everything else about English composition.

Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

5. Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

Sentences that aren't parallel sound funny, even if they look perfectly correct at first glance. Learn what makes a sentence parallel, how to revise a sentence to make it parallel, and how to write beautiful, balanced sentences of your own.

Selecting Subject & Object Pronouns: Rules & Examples

6. Selecting Subject & Object Pronouns: Rules & Examples

Discover the difference and usefulness of two different types of pronouns. Learn how to use subject pronouns and object pronouns effectively in writing.

Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

7. Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

Just who is telling this story? In this lesson, we'll look at point of view, or the perspective from which a work is told. We'll review first person, second person and third person points of view.

Subject-Verb Agreement: Using Uncommon Singular and Plural Nouns and Pronouns

8. Subject-Verb Agreement: Using Uncommon Singular and Plural Nouns and Pronouns

Subject-verb agreement is a tricky beast. Learn which uncommon singular and plural nouns and pronouns are most likely to trip you up when trying to craft essays with good grammar.

Verb Tense & Subject-Verb Agreement

9. Verb Tense & Subject-Verb Agreement

Learn all about verb tense and subject-verb agreement in our first lesson on this tricky topic. We'll look at examples to help you understand this concept.

Complex Subject-Verb Agreement: Inverted Order, Compound Subjects & Interrupting Phrases

10. Complex Subject-Verb Agreement: Inverted Order, Compound Subjects & Interrupting Phrases

Learn how subject-verb agreement is essential to written language. Three common problems with subject-verb agreement are discussed with tips for avoiding the most common errors.

Conjunctions: Coordinating & Correlative

11. Conjunctions: Coordinating & Correlative

Conjunctions are parts of speech that join together other words, phrases and clauses in sentences. Learn all about two types of conjunctions - coordinating and correlative - in this lesson.

Combining Dependent & Independent Clauses

12. Combining Dependent & Independent Clauses

Clauses are a great mystery to many people when dealing with our written language. Watch this video lesson to discover clauses and also to learn how to combine clauses correctly.

Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

13. Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

A mixed structure sentence is a common error that occurs when a writer starts a sentence with one structure but switches to a different structure in the middle of the sentence. This video will teach you how to spot and avoid this type of error.

Who, Whom, Whose & Who's

14. Who, Whom, Whose & Who's

Many people misuse 'who', 'whom,' 'whose' and 'who's.' Watch this video lesson to not only learn the difference between these confusing words but also how to use each one correctly.

The Difference Between Direct & Indirect Objects in Sentence Structure

15. The Difference Between Direct & Indirect Objects in Sentence Structure

Mixing up direct and indirect objects could drastically affect sentence structure. Watch this video lesson to finally learn how to differentiate between direct and indirect objects and also how to use each correctly.

Sentence Agreement: Avoiding Faulty Collective Ownership

16. Sentence Agreement: Avoiding Faulty Collective Ownership

A common error occurs whenever a writer uses wording that suggests that a lot of people own or use just one thing, when really they all own or use their own separate things. This video will explain how to identify and fix this type of error.

How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

17. How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

Your sentences may not always make as much sense as you think they do, especially if you're comparing two or more things. It's easy to let comparisons become illogical, incomplete, or ambiguous. Learn how to avoid making faulty comparisons on your way to writing a great essay.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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