Ch 9: Compass Writing Test: Sentence Structure

About This Chapter

Follow along with video lessons that show how to properly structure your sentences. The concepts you learn here by watching video lessons and taking short quizzes can prepare you for the ACT Compass Writing Essay Test.

Compass Writing Test: Sentence Structure - Chapter Summary

Watch video lessons to discover how the different parts of a sentence come together in a logical fashion so that you can compose strong, well-written sentences in the Compass Writing Essay Test. Each lesson focuses on a particular skill that you can use to enhance your writing in preparation for the test, such as:

  • Mastering subject-verb agreement
  • Using pronouns, nouns, and conjunctions properly
  • Writing logical sentences and properly identifying ownership
  • Using who, whom, whose and who's properly
  • Knowing the difference between dependent and independent clauses
  • Varying sentence structure to enhance your writing
  • Identifying the subject of a sentence
  • Differentiating between direct and indirect objects

Our instructors will guide you through each of these concepts so that you can fully prepare yourself to skillfully create sentences in your essay when taking the exam. The videos are engaging and easy to understand, which allows you to have fun while studying for your Compass Writing Essay Test.

Objectives of the Compass Writing Test: Sentence Structure Chapter

The Compass Writing Essay Test assesses your writing abilities in order to place you in the English courses that will best meet your skills and needs. Each lesson in this chapter addresses a topic relating to sentence structure, which will aid in preparing you to write an engaging and fluid essay on the exam. You can also use the quizzes throughout this chapter to get a clear idea of what you might expect to see on the real test.

The exam will require you to write an essay based on the prompt that's provided. Writing sentences that are structured well will help you create a strong, clearly-focused essay.

17 Lessons in Chapter 9: Compass Writing Test: Sentence Structure
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

1. Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

Having sentence clarity in your writing is key to create great essays. Learn how to write clear sentences, discover why you should pay attention to the rhythm of your writings, and look at the clear sentence checklist to turn odd ones into great ones.

Varied Sentence Structure in Writing

2. Varied Sentence Structure in Writing

Varied sentence structure makes a piece of writing more engaging to read. Learn how to define sentence structure, then explore how to switch it up with transitions, sentence length, and pronoun usage.

Independent & Dependent Clauses: Subordination & Coordination

3. Independent & Dependent Clauses: Subordination & Coordination

The independent clause, the simplest type of sentence, can be joined with dependent clauses or other independent clauses to add greater context. Explore dependent and independent clauses and how to use subordinating and coordinating conjunctions.

How to Identify the Subject of a Sentence

4. How to Identify the Subject of a Sentence

The subject is the main character of a sentence, while the verb is the action he/she is taking or the state he/she is in. Learn how to identify the subject and verb of a sentence, even in sentences with multiple subjects and verbs or written in passive voice, explore the different types of subjects, including simple subjects, complete subjects, compound subjects, and implied subjects, and check how to use pronouns.

Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

5. Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

A parallel structure can make sentences, whether they are comparisons, lists, or conjunctions, sound better as each sentence maintains a consistent structure throughout. Learn about parallelism and how to write and identify parallel sentences.

Selecting Subject & Object Pronouns: Rules & Examples

6. Selecting Subject & Object Pronouns: Rules & Examples

Pronouns are words that replace nouns in sentences in order to help reduce repetition and can be personal such as I, me, you, he, him, she, her, it, we, us, they, and them. Learn more on the rules and examples of selecting subject or object pronouns.

Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

7. Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

A point of view is defined as the perspective that a work--such as a dialogue--is written. Learn about the differences between the first, second, and third point of view, and how to properly use and identify them in writing.

Subject-Verb Agreement: Using Uncommon Singular and Plural Nouns and Pronouns

8. Subject-Verb Agreement: Using Uncommon Singular and Plural Nouns and Pronouns

Subject-verb agreement is when plural verbs are used with plural nouns and pronouns, and singular verbs are used with singular nouns and pronouns. Learn about uncommon group and singular nouns, indefinite pronouns, and how to use proper subject-verb agreement for grammatically correct writing.

Verb Tense & Subject-Verb Agreement

9. Verb Tense & Subject-Verb Agreement

When a document includes incorrect verb tenses and/or subject-verb agreements, it reads poorly. Learn about these grammatical problems and explore ways to create written documents with proper verb tenses and subject-verb agreements.

Complex Subject-Verb Agreement: Inverted Order, Compound Subjects & Interrupting Phrases

10. Complex Subject-Verb Agreement: Inverted Order, Compound Subjects & Interrupting Phrases

Subject-verb agreements can be difficult due to the irregularity of English plural subjects. Learn more about them in inverted order, compound subjects, and interrupting phrases.

Conjunctions: Coordinating & Correlative

11. Conjunctions: Coordinating & Correlative

A word or certain pair of words that joins other words, phrases, and clauses in a sentence is called a conjunction, of which there are two types. Learn what conjunctions are, and explore the two types: coordinating and correlative.

Combining Dependent & Independent Clauses

12. Combining Dependent & Independent Clauses

Dependent clauses and independent clauses can be combined using different methods. Learn more about clauses and understand how to use a comma, conjunction, and semicolon to join dependent and independent clauses.

Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

13. Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

Authors may accidentally change the structure of a sentence halfway through, creating a mixed sentence structure error. Learn about the rules of sentence structure and discover how to identify, correct, and avoid writing sentences with mixed structures.

Who, Whom, Whose & Who's

14. Who, Whom, Whose & Who's

Understanding sentence structure in any language is key to improving fluency. Learn more about the roles of subject, predicate, and verbs in an English sentence and when to use 'who,' 'whom,' 'whose,' and 'who's.'

The Difference Between Direct & Indirect Objects in Sentence Structure

15. The Difference Between Direct & Indirect Objects in Sentence Structure

Identifying the direct object and indirect object is important in creating a comprehensive sentence structure. Learn about subjects, predicates, and objects, the difference between direct and indirect objects, and the importance of sentence structure.

Sentence Agreement: Avoiding Faulty Collective Ownership

16. Sentence Agreement: Avoiding Faulty Collective Ownership

An improperly written sentence may imply multiple people own a single thing when they each own separate things. Learn how to maintain sentence agreement by identifying, correcting, and avoiding faulty collective ownership.

How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

17. How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

When used incorrectly, comparisons between two things can become faulty. Learn how to write logical sentences and avoid faulty comparisons like illogical comparison errors, no comparison errors, and misused comparatives and superlatives.

Chapter Practice Exam
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Practice Final Exam
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