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Ch 18: Complex Cognitive Processes in Learning

About This Chapter

Let us help you review pertinent information about complex cognitive processes involved in learning. You can take self-assessment quizzes along the way to test your knowledge.

Complex Cognitive Processes in Learning - Chapter Summary

With the lessons in this chapter, our expert instructors will help you refresh your understanding of various cognitive processes associated with student learning. You'll rediscover the ways that students take in and interpret information, and explore how to incorporate these processes into your instruction. After completing the lesson, you'll have examined:

  • Examples of complex cognitive processes
  • Comparison of low-effort and high-effort thinking
  • Activities for exploring facts vs. opinions
  • How to compare and contrast information
  • Types of bias
  • Inference and how to infer meaning
  • Techniques for teaching note-taking and summarizing
  • How to organize concepts and information
  • Strategies for generalizing and synthesizing information
  • Ways to make predictions when reading

We work diligently to keep the learning process efficient and effective. In this chapter, you'll view engaging lessons that help illustrate the material being reviewed. As you complete each lesson, take a quiz to see how well you understand the information. Track your progress on your Dashboard, and when you've completed the lessons, take the cumulative chapter exam to apply all that you've learned.

10 Lessons in Chapter 18: Complex Cognitive Processes in Learning
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Complex Cognitive Processes: Definition & Examples

1. Complex Cognitive Processes: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we will learn about the six complex cognitive processes that are used by students. These processes help them make sense of newly acquired information in ways that prepare the new information for storage in memory.

Low-Effort vs. High-Effort Thinking: Advantages & Disadvantages

2. Low-Effort vs. High-Effort Thinking: Advantages & Disadvantages

Our cognitive wheels are always in motion, even if we don't realize it. In this lesson, we discuss thinking and differentiate between low-effort and high-effort thinking. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each type of thinking.

Facts vs. Opinions: Examples, Games & Activities

3. Facts vs. Opinions: Examples, Games & Activities

Being able to discriminate between facts and opinions is an important reading skill elementary students need to understand. But how do you tell the difference between the two? Luckily, there's a straightforward way to teach fact and opinion. That's a fact. Trust me.

Comparing and Contrasting: Examples & Concept

4. Comparing and Contrasting: Examples & Concept

Learn about the development strategy of comparing and contrasting, and how to apply it in an essay. Review the examples, and then take a quiz to test your new knowledge.

What is Bias? - Definition & Types

5. What is Bias? - Definition & Types

Through this lesson, you will learn how to define bias and explore a brief introduction to some of the types that exist in psychology and the social sciences. When you are through with the lesson, you can test your new knowledge with a short quiz.

What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

6. What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

In this lesson, we will define the terms inference and intended meaning. We will then discuss what steps to take when making inferences in literature.

Instructional Strategies for Summarizing & Note-Taking

7. Instructional Strategies for Summarizing & Note-Taking

Note-taking and summarizing is an important skill for students. This lesson will highlight techniques for each and show how teachers can effectively instruct students on the use of these skills.

Organizing and Categorizing Ideas, Concepts and Information

8. Organizing and Categorizing Ideas, Concepts and Information

In this lesson, you will learn clear, simple ways to group your ideas together. First, you'll figure out what the paper is about, and then the rest is easy!

Teaching Students to Generalize & Synthesize Information

9. Teaching Students to Generalize & Synthesize Information

Teaching students to generalize and synthesize takes time and requires careful thought and planning. This lesson will introduce you to some ideas for working on the development of these important skills with students of all ages.

How to Make Predictions Based on Information from a Reading Selection

10. How to Make Predictions Based on Information from a Reading Selection

Making predictions when reading is an important reading comprehension strategy. In this lesson, we will discuss why it is important and how to model and practice it.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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