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Ch 3: Constitutional Law: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Constitutional Law chapter of this College-Level Introductory Business Law Help and Review course is the simplest way to master an understanding of constitutional law. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of constitutional law.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering college business material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn college business topics. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding rule of law or working with the amendments
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning business content (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about constitutional law
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra business learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Constitutional Law chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Constitutional Law chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any constitutional law question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in a constitutional law unit of a standard college business course. Topics covered include:

  • Rule of law
  • First and fourth amendments
  • Due process and takings of the fifth and fourteenth amendments
  • The equal protection clause
  • Ninth amendment and rights retained by the people

19 Lessons in Chapter 3: Constitutional Law: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What Is the Rule of Law? - Definition & Principle

1. What Is the Rule of Law? - Definition & Principle

Rule of law takes on several meanings. On one hand, it means that no person or government is above the law. In another, it means that no government or its officials can enforce laws that are unfair or unjust.

The First Amendment: Commercial Speech, Scrutiny & Restrictions

2. The First Amendment: Commercial Speech, Scrutiny & Restrictions

The First Amendment of the Constitution states that all citizens are free to practice their preferred religion, speak freely and to assemble. Learn how and why businesses are less protected and are held to a higher scrutiny in this lesson.

The Fourth Amendment: Search & Seizure

3. The Fourth Amendment: Search & Seizure

One of our rights according to the Bill of Rights and the U.S. Constitution is the Fourth Amendment, and it protects citizens from illegal search and seizure of person or property with proper warrants stating probable cause.

Due Process & Taking the Fifth & Fourteenth Amendments

4. Due Process & Taking the Fifth & Fourteenth Amendments

There are only two amendments that stand for the same rights: the 5th Amendment and 14th Amendment. In this lesson, we will learn how both amendments speak to the rights of life, liberty and property with government protection and due process.

The Equal Protection Clause in the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments

5. The Equal Protection Clause in the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments

Both the 5th Amendment and the 14th Amendment of the US Constitution provide all citizens with equal protection of their right to life, liberty and property. The main difference being the 5th Amendment provides it under the Due Process clause.

Ninth Amendment: Rights Retained by People

6. Ninth Amendment: Rights Retained by People

The purpose of the Ninth Amendment is to protect the citizens' rights that aren't necessarily mentioned elsewhere in the Constitution, like the right to privacy or the right to marry. It also prevents the violation of those rights by the government.

What is The 2nd Amendment? - Definition, History & Court Cases

7. What is The 2nd Amendment? - Definition, History & Court Cases

In this lesson, we will define the 2nd Amendment, look at its origins and then examine famous Supreme Court cases involving the amendment. The lesson concludes by noting the ways in which the 2nd Amendment continues to be debated today.

What Are the Economic Functions of Government?

8. What Are the Economic Functions of Government?

Find out what the six economic functions of government are in the United States. See some examples in each of the categories and find out how you benefit from them.

District of Columbia v Heller in 2008: Summary & Decision

9. District of Columbia v Heller in 2008: Summary & Decision

In this lesson we will discuss the case of District of Columbia v. Heller in 2008. The lesson will have a summary of the case and will also discuss the decision made by the courts.

Fighting Words Doctrine: Definition, Law & Examples

10. Fighting Words Doctrine: Definition, Law & Examples

Not all speech is protected by the First Amendment. 'Fighting words' receive no constitutional protection. This lesson explains what constitutes fighting words and defines the fighting words doctrine.

Fletcher v. Peck: Summary & Significance

11. Fletcher v. Peck: Summary & Significance

Following this lesson, you will know the facts and the Supreme Court decision in the case entitled Fletcher v. Peck. Moreover, you will review and understand the significance of the case.

McDonald v. City of Chicago in 2010: Summary & Decision

12. McDonald v. City of Chicago in 2010: Summary & Decision

McDonald v. City of Chicago in 2010 was a landmark case for gun rights in the City of Chicago. This lesson will discuss the case as well as the decision the Supreme Court made in this case.

Prayer in Public Schools: History, Law, Pros & Cons

13. Prayer in Public Schools: History, Law, Pros & Cons

Prayer in public schools is still a topic that's deliberated today. This lesson takes you through the history, law, pros, and cons of prayer in schools and offers a quiz to test your knowledge on this topic.

Pre-Emption: Definition & Rights

14. Pre-Emption: Definition & Rights

Study this lesson to better understand the concept of pre-emption. Review rights that arise from pre-emption and recognize when these rights come into play.

Reynolds v. United States in 1879: Summary & Decision

15. Reynolds v. United States in 1879: Summary & Decision

In this lesson we will discuss the case of ''Reynold's v. United States''. We'll take a look at the case summary and learn how the courts ruled in the case. Following this you can test your knowledge with a quiz!

What is Exculpatory Evidence? - Definition, Examples & Importance

16. What is Exculpatory Evidence? - Definition, Examples & Importance

Exculpatory evidence is any evidence in a criminal trial that supports the idea that the defendant is not guilty. In this lesson, we'll discuss what kind of evidence is considered exculpatory, plus examples, and we'll also examine how important it is.

What is an Exculpatory Clause? - Definition & Examples

17. What is an Exculpatory Clause? - Definition & Examples

In this lesson, you will learn about exculpatory clauses and the different scenarios in which they are used. You'll also learn about the conditions that make exculpatory clauses enforceable.

What is Exculpatory Language? - Definition & Examples

18. What is Exculpatory Language? - Definition & Examples

Exculpatory language is used in contracts to strip someone of his or her rights. In this lesson we will examine what exculpatory language is, show its limitations, and provide examples.

What is Sedition? - Definition & Examples

19. What is Sedition? - Definition & Examples

In this lesson, you will learn the meaning of sedition, how it has evolved over the centuries, and why it was considered the worst crime one could commit against a government.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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