Ch 14: Conventions in Writing - Usage: Homeschool Curriculum

About This Chapter

The Conventions in Writing - Usage unit of this 11th Grade English Homeschool course is designed to help homeschooled students learn about usage writing conventions. Parents can use the short videos to introduce topics, break up lessons and keep students engaged.

Who's it for?

This unit of our 11th Grade English Homeschool course will benefit any student who is trying to learn about usage conventions in writing. There is no faster or easier way to learn about English usage. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who require an efficient, self-paced course of study to learn about the use of good diction, logical sentences, idioms and clear sentences.
  • Homeschool parents looking to spend less time preparing lessons and more time teaching.
  • Homeschool parents who need an English curriculum that appeals to multiple learning types (visual or auditory).
  • Gifted students and students with learning differences.

How it works:

  • Students watch a short, fun video lesson that covers a specific unit topic.
  • Students and parents can refer to the video transcripts to reinforce learning.
  • Short quizzes and a Conventions in Writing - Usage unit exam confirm understanding or identify any topics that require review.

Conventions in Writing - Usage Unit Objectives:

  • Explore what makes strong writing.
  • Learn how to develop style, tone and point-of-view with good diction.
  • Explain methods for using idioms or phrasal verbs.
  • Compare active and passive voice.
  • Address ways of writing logical sentences and avoiding faulty comparisons.
  • Identify strategies for writing clear sentences.
  • Discuss the identification and avoidance of mixed structure sentences.

7 Lessons in Chapter 14: Conventions in Writing - Usage: Homeschool Curriculum
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Write Well: What Makes Writing Good?

1. How to Write Well: What Makes Writing Good?

From great ideas to great execution, learn what makes writing 'good' and how to transform your writing from 'okay' to accomplished through the use of specific examples, great ideas, and organization.

How to Write With Good Diction to Develop Style, Tone & Point-of-View

2. How to Write With Good Diction to Develop Style, Tone & Point-of-View

Developing a good writing style starts with developing good diction. You can't craft an essay or story the way you want without being able to choose the right words first. Here's how.

How to Write with Idioms or Phrasal Verbs

3. How to Write with Idioms or Phrasal Verbs

In this lesson, you will learn how to identify idioms and phrasal verbs. Once you can recognize these parts of speech, you will be able to use them yourself in your writing.

Active and Passive Voice

4. Active and Passive Voice

You may have heard your teachers toss around the terms 'passive voice' and 'active voice'. But if you've never really understood what it means to write actively or passively, stick with us -- and learn how to turn to awkward passive sentences into bright, active ones.

How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

5. How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

Your sentences may not always make as much sense as you think they do, especially if you're comparing two or more things. It's easy to let comparisons become illogical, incomplete, or ambiguous. Learn how to avoid making faulty comparisons on your way to writing a great essay.

Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

6. Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

Just because you know a good sentence when you read one doesn't mean that you think it's easy to put one together - forget about writing an essay's worth. Learn how to write clear sentences and turn rough ones into gems.

Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

7. Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

A mixed structure sentence is a common error that occurs when a writer starts a sentence with one structure but switches to a different structure in the middle of the sentence. This video will teach you how to spot and avoid this type of error.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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