Ch 10: Crimes Against Property

About This Chapter

In this chapter, you'll review a collection of lessons and quizzes that examine various crimes against property. The chapter can function as a convenient homework help tool, tutoring solution or test preparation resource.

Crimes Against Property - Chapter Summary

If you need to review different types of crimes against property, you're in the right place. This comprehensive chapter explores a variety of property-related crimes, including home invasion, arson, criminal trespassing, robbery, consolidated theft and federal mail fraud. These lessons are designed to be short and engaging, which helps you quickly review the material and remember key concepts. When you're finished with a lesson, take the accompanying quiz to make sure you fully understand the material. By the end of the chapter, you should be able to:

  • Assess consolidated theft statutes
  • Define the elements of federal mail fraud
  • Explain the meaning of extortion
  • Interpret robbery statistics
  • Evaluate laws regarding stolen property, arson, criminal trespass and criminal mischief
  • Discuss the significance of the People v. Pratt case
  • Recognize the differences between home invasion and burglary

8 Lessons in Chapter 10: Crimes Against Property
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Federal Mail Fraud: Definition & Federal Statute

1. Federal Mail Fraud: Definition & Federal Statute

Mail fraud is a federal crime that is regulated under the Mail Fraud Act. It involves acts of fraud in which the mail system is used to carry out a crime. This lesson will examine mail fraud, laws that prohibit it, and related penalties.

What is Extortion? - Definition, Meaning & Examples

2. What is Extortion? - Definition, Meaning & Examples

Extortion is a serious crime. Find out what is considered extortion under U.S. law by learning more about protection schemes, blackmail, and hacking. Extortion is a crime that can involve no specific illegal action.

Robbery: Definition & Statistics

3. Robbery: Definition & Statistics

The term robbery conjures up images of a group of masked men storming into the bank with guns blazing. In reality, robbery includes any crime in which a suspect uses force or threats to remove property from a victim.

Receiving Stolen Property: Definition & Laws

4. Receiving Stolen Property: Definition & Laws

In this lesson, you will understand the crime of receiving stolen property, how the value of property affects the level of crime, and different ways that an offender could be in violation of this section.

People v. Pratt: Facts, Decision, & Significance

5. People v. Pratt: Facts, Decision, & Significance

What does the word 'stolen' mean? In the legal system, even a simple question like that can be difficult to answer. In this lesson, we'll examine the Michigan case 'People v. Pratt,' and how it grappled with that very question.

Burglary & Home Invasion: Definition & Differences

6. Burglary & Home Invasion: Definition & Differences

In this lesson, you're going to first learn about the definition of burglary and the elements involved therein. Then, we'll repeat this process for home invasion.

Criminal Trespass & Criminal Mischief: Definitions & Laws

7. Criminal Trespass & Criminal Mischief: Definitions & Laws

In this lesson, you'll learn about the crimes of criminal trespass and criminal mischief. We'll explain how laws apply to different circumstances and how particular behavior dictates the charging level.

What is Arson? - Definition & Law

8. What is Arson? - Definition & Law

What constitutes arson, and how has the definition of this crime changed over time? This lesson explains the elements of arson as well as why there are various degrees of the crime.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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