Ch 27: Critical Thinking Skills for AP US History: Homework Help

About This Chapter

The Critical Thinking Skills for AP US History chapter of this AP US History Homework Help course helps students complete their critical thinking history homework and earn better grades. This homework help resource uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long.

How It works:

  • Identify which concepts are covered on your AP US history critical thinking skills homework.
  • Find videos on those topics within this chapter.
  • Watch fun videos, pausing and reviewing as needed.
  • Complete sample problems and get instant feedback.
  • Finish your critical thinking skills homework with ease!

Topics from your homework you'll be able to complete:

  • Differentiation between primary and secondary research
  • Analyzing the purpose and context of texts
  • Recognize differences between fact, informed opinion and persuasion
  • Assess argument validity and bias
  • Historical theories analysis
  • Examine historical events from differing perspectives
  • Recognize historical, biographical, and linguistic context
  • Finding inferences and conclusions from textual evidence
  • Seeing cause and effect in a historical context
  • Examine ways history is organized using calendars, maps and periodization

13 Lessons in Chapter 27: Critical Thinking Skills for AP US History: Homework Help
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Primary & Secondary Research: Definition, Differences & Methods

1. Primary & Secondary Research: Definition, Differences & Methods

Differentiating between different types of research articles is useful when looking at what has already been done. In this lesson, we explore some of the different types of research articles out there and when they would be used.

How to Analyze the Purpose of a Text

2. How to Analyze the Purpose of a Text

In this lesson, we will learn how to analyze the purpose of a text. We will explore some of the primary purposes and practice determining purpose using some writing samples.

Interpreting Works in Context

3. Interpreting Works in Context

In this lesson, we will learn how to interpret a written work in its context. We will explore the historical context, biographical context, context of language and form, and context of the reader.

Fact vs. Persuasion vs. Informed Opinion in Nonfiction

4. Fact vs. Persuasion vs. Informed Opinion in Nonfiction

How do you know what to believe and what to doubt? Watch this video lesson to learn how to differentiate between facts, persuasion, and informed opinions.

Recognizing Biases, Assumptions & Stereotypes in Written Works

5. Recognizing Biases, Assumptions & Stereotypes in Written Works

In this lesson, we will define and learn how to recognize biases, assumptions and stereotypes in written works. We will also practice identifying these elements with a few writing samples.

How to Analyze an Argument's Effectiveness & Validity

6. How to Analyze an Argument's Effectiveness & Validity

In this lesson, we will learn how to analyze an argument. We will pay close attention to the parts of an argument and the questions we must ask about each of those parts in order to determine the argument's effectiveness and validity.

How Historical Theories Affect Interpretations of the Past

7. How Historical Theories Affect Interpretations of the Past

Unlike scientists looking for a theory of everything, historians know that there are many different theories to explain the past. This lesson shows how different theories work together to help provide historians with the best view possible.

Evaluating Major Historical Issues & Events From Diverse Perspectives

8. Evaluating Major Historical Issues & Events From Diverse Perspectives

Ever watched a football game with someone who was cheering for the other team and disagreed on the validity of a call? Then you've encountered the same problem historians find with diverse perspectives.

Textual Evidence & Interpreting an Informational Text

9. Textual Evidence & Interpreting an Informational Text

In this lesson, we will explore informational texts. Along the way, we will discover a few tips to make reading this type of text easier, and we will pay special attention to textual evidence.

What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

10. What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

In this lesson, we will define the terms inference and intended meaning. We will then discuss what steps to take when making inferences in literature.

Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

11. Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

When someone drops hints, we're able to draw conclusions about what they're really trying to say. Similarly, as readers, we use clues to draw conclusions from texts. This lesson explains how to draw conclusions and how to teach this important skill.

Historical Change: Causes and Effects

12. Historical Change: Causes and Effects

In this lesson, we will examine historical change. We will learn what factors contribute to historical change and see how historical change is perceived through different classifications.

Organizing History with Calendars, Maps & Periodization

13. Organizing History with Calendars, Maps & Periodization

While historians may not have fancy labs to help make sense of their work, this does not mean that they are without specialized tools. This lesson discusses three of those tools, namely calendars, maps and periodization.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 160 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support