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Ch 10: CSET English: Grammar and Usage

About This Chapter

This chapter's video lessons and quizzes cover content included on the CSET English Subtest I. Use these resources on grammar and usage to prepare for these types of questions in time for the exam.

CSET English Subtest I: Grammar and Usage - Chapter Summary

Before you can become a licensed English teacher in California, you'll need to successfully answer questions about grammar and usage on the CSET English Subtest I. This chapter's videos can help you prepare for the exam by showing you how to identify the following:

  • Subject-verb agreement errors
  • Verb tense and pronoun use errors
  • Coordinating and correlative conjunctions
  • Colons, semicolons and periods
  • Independent and dependent clauses
  • Misplaced modifiers and dangling modifiers
  • Parallelism and parallel sentences
  • Logical sentences and faulty comparisons
  • Active and passive voice
  • Idioms or phrasal verbs
  • Commonly confused words in English
  • Capitalization rules in writing
  • Homonyms and homophones

These video lessons cover the same content areas you'll find on the exam, and can be used along with the self-assessment quizzes to identify subjects requiring additional study. You can use these materials to create a study plan and get an idea of what to expect on exam day.

CSET English Subtest I: Grammar and Usage Course Objectives

The Grammar and Usage chapter can get you ready for exam questions designed to test your knowledge of composition and rhetoric. There are ten questions covering this content area, some of which ask you to determine how grammatical elements like active and passive voice or coordinating and subordinating clauses determine a text's style and tone. This chapter can also prepare you to answer questions asking you to identify types of faulty logic as well as the improper and proper use of parts of speech, including pronouns and verbs.

Overall, there are 50 multiple-choice questions on the CSET English Subtest I. Points are awarded for correct answers, and exam scores are used to evaluate the academic preparedness of English teacher licensure candidates in California. Subset I is the first exam in this 4-part series.

17 Lessons in Chapter 10: CSET English: Grammar and Usage
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Identifying Subject-Verb Agreement Errors

1. Identifying Subject-Verb Agreement Errors

It's important that the subject and verb in every sentence agree in number. While it's often easy to make this happen, there are a few situations in which it can be tricky to achieve subject-verb agreement. This lesson explains how you can be sure to pair the right verb with a subject.

Identifying Errors of Verb Tense

2. Identifying Errors of Verb Tense

In order to identify verb tense errors, you'll need to learn about the six verb tenses and how they differ. Once you know how to look for them, problematic shifts in verb tenses can be spotted and avoided easily.

Identifying Errors of Singular and Plural Pronouns

3. Identifying Errors of Singular and Plural Pronouns

It's sometimes not completely clear at first whether a singular or plural pronoun is necessary in a sentence. This lesson covers those confusing situations and explains how to be sure that you're using the right pronoun.

Conjunctions: Coordinating & Correlative

4. Conjunctions: Coordinating & Correlative

Conjunctions are parts of speech that join together other words, phrases and clauses in sentences. Learn all about two types of conjunctions - coordinating and correlative - in this lesson.

Punctuation: Using Colons, Semicolons & Periods

5. Punctuation: Using Colons, Semicolons & Periods

Periods, colons, and semicolons all have the ability to stop a sentence in its tracks, but for very different purposes. In this lesson, learn how and why we use them in our writing.

Sentence Agreement: Avoiding Faulty Collective Ownership

6. Sentence Agreement: Avoiding Faulty Collective Ownership

A common error occurs whenever a writer uses wording that suggests that a lot of people own or use just one thing, when really they all own or use their own separate things. This video will explain how to identify and fix this type of error.

Independent & Dependent Clauses: Subordination & Coordination

7. Independent & Dependent Clauses: Subordination & Coordination

This lesson is about independent and dependent clauses, and how they make up a sentence. Dependent clauses, like the name suggests, rely on other elements in a sentence. Independent clauses, on the other hand, can stand alone. Learn more in this lesson.

What Are Misplaced Modifiers and Dangling Modifiers?

8. What Are Misplaced Modifiers and Dangling Modifiers?

I have this recurring nightmare where all my modifiers are misplaced or dangling and everybody's laughing at me. Don't let this happen to you! Learn why modifiers are important and why putting them in the right place is even more so.

Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

9. Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

Sentences that aren't parallel sound funny, even if they look perfectly correct at first glance. Learn what makes a sentence parallel, how to revise a sentence to make it parallel, and how to write beautiful, balanced sentences of your own.

How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

10. How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

Your sentences may not always make as much sense as you think they do, especially if you're comparing two or more things. It's easy to let comparisons become illogical, incomplete, or ambiguous. Learn how to avoid making faulty comparisons on your way to writing a great essay.

Active and Passive Voice

11. Active and Passive Voice

You may have heard your teachers toss around the terms 'passive voice' and 'active voice'. But if you've never really understood what it means to write actively or passively, stick with us -- and learn how to turn to awkward passive sentences into bright, active ones.

How to Write with Idioms or Phrasal Verbs

12. How to Write with Idioms or Phrasal Verbs

In this lesson, you will learn how to identify idioms and phrasal verbs. Once you can recognize these parts of speech, you will be able to use them yourself in your writing.

Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

13. Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

Just because you know a good sentence when you read one doesn't mean that you think it's easy to put one together - forget about writing an essay's worth. Learn how to write clear sentences and turn rough ones into gems.

How to Write a Strong Essay Body

14. How to Write a Strong Essay Body

This video will show you how to achieve unified, coherent body paragraphs in your essays. By creating well-developed body paragraphs, your essays will be cleaner, sharper and earn you a better grade!

Commonly Confused Words in English

15. Commonly Confused Words in English

Is it 'accept' or 'except?' 'Affect' or 'effect?' How do you know when to use 'there,' 'their,' or 'they're?' Watch this video lesson to learn about some confusing words in English and how to properly use each one.

Capitalization Rules in Writing

16. Capitalization Rules in Writing

Capitalization is a very important concept in standard grammar in the written form of the English language. Watch this video lesson to learn what capitalization is and when to use it.

Spelling: Words That Sound Alike (Homonyms & Homophones)

17. Spelling: Words That Sound Alike (Homonyms & Homophones)

Watch this lesson to learn to differentiate between words that sound alike but may be spelled differently. We'll specifically look at homonyms, homographs, and homophones.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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