Ch 12: CSET English: Improving Literacy

About This Chapter

Use this chapter's video lessons to revisit important literacy studies concepts. Study online at your convenience, then take the self-assessment quizzes prior to sitting for the CSET English examination for teacher certification.

CSET English: Improving Literacy - Chapter Summary

Strengthen your understanding of literary studies as you prepare to take the CSET English examination. Within this chapter's online video lessons, you'll find material on the usefulness of visualization as a reading strategy. In addition, you'll discover the importance of identifying key elements when searching for meaning in literary writings. Review this chapter for help with:

  • Evaluating reasoning
  • Providing examples of assonance, consonance and repetition
  • Studying the use of understatement in literature
  • Recognizing inferences in literature
  • Interpreting literature by using prior knowledge, word structure and context clues
  • Discussing how to visualize when reading
  • Understanding connotation and denotation in literature
  • Defining mood and tone
  • Examining literary structure's effects on writing
  • Developing close and big-picture reading strategies
  • Utilizing the text to interpret literary meaning
  • Learning about capitalization rules and commonly-confused words
  • Practicing the process of drawing conclusions from text
  • Studying literary forms and genres

The credentialed instructors present the lessons and can also answer your literary studies questions. You can review anywhere if you have access to Web-connected technology, and you'll be able to study whenever time permits. The lessons also include video tags for pausing and moving around freely. Self-assessment quizzes are also available to assess your understanding and familiarize you with the sorts of questions you'll encounter on the CSET English examination.

CSET English: Improving Literacy Chapter Objectives

The computer-based CSET English examination includes four subtests. You'll find that you can apply what you learned in this chapter when you take Subtests I and III. The domains in Subtest I are Reading Literature and Informational Texts and Composition and Rhetoric. There are 50 multiple-choice questions in Subtest I. Subtest III covers the same topics, but you'll only answer two constructed-response questions there. Subtests II and IV include questions on language and communications, respectively. Take any one subtest at a time, or choose to sit for all four at one time. Overall, you'll have one hour and 30 minutes to complete Subtest I, III and IV, and you'll be allowed a time limit of one hour to finish Subtest II.

13 Lessons in Chapter 12: CSET English: Improving Literacy
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

1. Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

Being able to effectively evaluate reasoning can be helpful to you as you develop your own deductive and inductive reasoning skills and put those skills to work in persuasive essays. This lesson sheds some light on how to evaluate reasoning.

Consonance, Assonance, and Repetition: Definitions & Examples

2. Consonance, Assonance, and Repetition: Definitions & Examples

In this lesson, explore the different ways authors repeat consonant and vowel sounds in their literary works. Learn about how writers use repeated words and phrases with well-known examples.

Understatement & Litotes: Differences, Definitions & Examples

3. Understatement & Litotes: Differences, Definitions & Examples

In this lesson, explore the use of understatement as a way to draw attention to a specific quality or to add humor. Learn about litotes, a specific form of understatement, and discover examples from literature.

What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

4. What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

In this lesson, we will define the terms inference and intended meaning. We will then discuss what steps to take when making inferences in literature.

Constructing Meaning with Context Clues, Prior Knowledge & Word Structure

5. Constructing Meaning with Context Clues, Prior Knowledge & Word Structure

In this lesson, you will learn how readers use prior knowledge, context clues and word structure to aid their understanding of what they read. Explore these strategies through examples from literature and everyday life.

Reading Strategies Using Visualization

6. Reading Strategies Using Visualization

In this lesson, we will define visualization. We will then discuss why this step is important, how we can visualize, and when you should visualize. Finally, we will look at a sample from a poem and practice visualizing.

What Are Connotation and Denotation? - Definitions & Examples

7. What Are Connotation and Denotation? - Definitions & Examples

Discover the difference between a word's denotation and its connotation in this lesson. Explore how authors use both denotation and connotation to add layers of meaning to their work with some literary examples.

Understanding Tone and Mood in a Reading Passage

8. Understanding Tone and Mood in a Reading Passage

In this lesson, we will define the literary terms tone and mood. We will then discuss how to identify each of them, as well as how to identify them in small reading passages.

What is Structure in Writing and How Does it Affect Meaning?

9. What is Structure in Writing and How Does it Affect Meaning?

In this lesson, we will define the role of structure in literature. From there, we will look at the different ways to structure fiction and how it affects the meaning.

Close Reading vs. Big Picture Reading Strategies

10. Close Reading vs. Big Picture Reading Strategies

In this lesson, learn about two different approaches to reading a work of literature: big picture strategies and close reading strategies. Discover how these two perspectives can be put into practice through examples from the play 'Romeo and Juliet.'

Interpreting Literary Meaning: How to Use Text to Guide Your Interpretation

11. Interpreting Literary Meaning: How to Use Text to Guide Your Interpretation

In this lesson, we will discuss how to find and interpret literary meaning in writings. The lesson will focus on using the text to find key elements to guide your interpretation.

Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

12. Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

When someone drops hints, we're able to draw conclusions about what they're really trying to say. Similarly, as readers, we use clues to draw conclusions from texts. This lesson explains how to draw conclusions and how to teach this important skill.

Literary Forms & Genres: How They Affect Meaning

13. Literary Forms & Genres: How They Affect Meaning

In this lesson, we will explore literary forms and genres. We'll define these terms, look at examples of each, and see how they affect the meaning of the texts they characterize.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support