Ch 6: CSET Math: Probability

About This Chapter

Let us teach you about permutations and the probability of combinations. The video lessons and quizzes in this chapter use different approaches to help you correctly answer these types of questions on the CSET: Math II test.

CSET Math: Probability - Chapter Summary

This chapter features lessons on calculating permutations, the probability of combinations, conditional probabilities and binomial probabilities. The methods listed below are addressed individually in this chapter, helping you to understand how to use each method in preparation for similar questions on the exam:

  • Calculating the probability of permutations
  • Using factorials to calculate combinations
  • Determining finite probability with models
  • Calculating simple conditional probabilities
  • Understanding conditional and independent probabilities
  • Determining the probability of an outcome
  • Determining properties of normal distribution
  • Approximating binomial probabilities with normal distribution
  • Using tables and formulas to find binomial probabilities
  • Solving probability problems with exponential distributions

CSET Math: Probability

The CSET Math exam is used by the State of California to assess your readiness to teach math. The math exam comprises three subtests, which gauge your knowledge of calculus, algebra, geometry, probability and number theory. In Subtest II, you'll find 30 multiple choice questions and four constructed response questions on probability and statistics and geometry subjects.

Our chapter on probability features self-assessment quizzes that accompany each video lesson. Use these quizzes to test your knowledge of probability methods and get familiar with the style of questions found on the exam.

11 Lessons in Chapter 6: CSET Math: Probability
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Calculate a Permutation

1. How to Calculate a Permutation

A permutation is a method used to calculate the total outcomes of a situation where order is important. In this lesson, John will use permutations to help him organize the cards in his poker hand and order a pizza.

How to Calculate the Probability of Permutations

2. How to Calculate the Probability of Permutations

In this lesson, you will learn how to calculate the probability of a permutation by analyzing a real-world example in which the order of the events does matter. We'll also review what a factorial is. We will then go over some examples for practice.

Math Combinations: Formula and Example Problems

3. Math Combinations: Formula and Example Problems

Combinations are an arrangement of objects where order does not matter. In this lesson, the coach of the Wildcats basketball team uses combinations to help his team prepare for the upcoming season.

How to Calculate the Probability of Combinations

4. How to Calculate the Probability of Combinations

To calculate the probability of a combination, you will need to consider the number of favorable outcomes over the number of total outcomes. Combinations are used to calculate events where order does not matter. In this lesson, we will explore the connection between these two essential topics.

How to Calculate Simple Conditional Probabilities

5. How to Calculate Simple Conditional Probabilities

Conditional probability, just like it sounds, is a probability that happens on the condition of a previous event occurring. To calculate conditional probabilities, we must first consider the effects of the previous event on the current event.

The Relationship Between Conditional Probabilities & Independence

6. The Relationship Between Conditional Probabilities & Independence

Conditional and independent probabilities are a basic part of learning statistics. It's important that you can understand the similarities and differences between the two as discussed in this lesson.

Applying Conditional Probability & Independence to Real Life Situations

7. Applying Conditional Probability & Independence to Real Life Situations

It can be really confusing learning how to apply conditional and independent probability to real-life situations. This lesson focuses on several examples and practice problems to help you learn how to find conditional probability.

Normal Distribution: Definition, Properties, Characteristics & Example

8. Normal Distribution: Definition, Properties, Characteristics & Example

In this lesson, we will look at the Normal Distribution, more commonly known as the Bell Curve. We'll look at some of its fascinating properties and learn why it is one of the most important distributions in the study of data.

Using Normal Distribution to Approximate Binomial Probabilities

9. Using Normal Distribution to Approximate Binomial Probabilities

Binomial probabilities describe processes in our world. Learn how to create and interpret a binomial probability distribution graph, and discover how the normal distribution can form a good approximation of the binomial distribution.

Using the Normal Distribution: Practice Problems

10. Using the Normal Distribution: Practice Problems

In this lesson, we will put the normal distribution to work by solving a few practice problems that help us to really master all that the distribution, as well as Z-Scores, have to offer. Review the concepts with a short quiz at the end.

Central Tendency: Measures, Definition & Examples

11. Central Tendency: Measures, Definition & Examples

Explore the measures of central tendency. Learn more about mean, median, and mode and how they are used in the field of psychology. At the end, test your knowledge with a short quiz.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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