Ch 4: Drama for 10th Grade: Homeschool Curriculum

About This Chapter

The Drama unit of this 10th Grade English Homeschool course is designed to help homeschooled students learn about aspects of drama. Parents can use the short videos to introduce topics, break up lessons and keep students engaged.

Who's it for?

This unit of our 10th Grade English Homeschool course will benefit any student who is trying to learn about drama. There is no faster or easier way to learn about drama for 10th grade. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who require an efficient, self-paced course of study to learn about the elements of drama, interpretation of dialogue from a script, the structure of a drama, stage directions and character motivation.
  • Homeschool parents looking to spend less time preparing lessons and more time teaching.
  • Homeschool parents who need an English curriculum that appeals to multiple learning types (visual or auditory).
  • Gifted students and students with learning differences.

How it works:

  • Students watch a short, fun video lesson that covers a specific unit topic.
  • Students and parents can refer to the video transcripts to reinforce learning.
  • Short quizzes and a drama for 10th grade unit exam confirm understanding or identify any topics that require review.

Drama for 10th Grade Unit Objectives:

  • Learn about characters, plot, setting and symbolism.
  • Explore exposition, rising action, climax, falling action and resolution.
  • Understand how to read and interpret dialogue from a script or play.
  • Interpret the main idea and purpose of a scene.
  • Observe the use of punctuation in drama dialogues.
  • Explain stage directions in a drama.
  • Make inferences about the mood in dramas.
  • Meet Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller, and study several of their well-known plays.

15 Lessons in Chapter 4: Drama for 10th Grade: Homeschool Curriculum
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Elements of Drama: Characters, Plot, Setting & Symbolism

1. Elements of Drama: Characters, Plot, Setting & Symbolism

Have you ever wondered how actors in a play can convey a story without the audience reading the script? Watch and learn how playwrights use dramatic elements to tell a story on the stage.

Plot Elements in Drama: From Exposition to Resolution

2. Plot Elements in Drama: From Exposition to Resolution

Plays follow a predictable pattern that is referred to as their dramatic structure. In this lesson, you'll learn the five parts of dramatic structure, and you'll have the opportunity to test yourself at the end with a short quiz.

Drama Structure: Acts, Scenes, Prologue & Epilogue

3. Drama Structure: Acts, Scenes, Prologue & Epilogue

Plays have a definite structure that can include a prologue, acts, scenes, and an epilogue. In this lesson, you'll learn about each of those parts and how they fit together to form a play.

Reading & Interpreting Dialogue from a Script or Play

4. Reading & Interpreting Dialogue from a Script or Play

Interpreting lines from a play means more than understanding the definitions of the words. In this lesson, you'll learn how to tap into the emotional content of lines and develop an interpretation.

Interpreting the Main Idea and Purpose of a Scene

5. Interpreting the Main Idea and Purpose of a Scene

Essays usually have a stated main idea, but it's not as obvious in a play. In this lesson, you'll learn a technique that will help you determine the main idea and purpose of a dramatic scene.

The Use of Punctuation in Dramatic Dialogue

6. The Use of Punctuation in Dramatic Dialogue

Playwrights use punctuation to tell their actors how to deliver their lines. In this lesson, you'll learn about three types of punctuation and the effects they have when used in dramatic dialogue.

Identifying Stage Directions in a Drama

7. Identifying Stage Directions in a Drama

Plays don't only contain the words the characters say; they also have stage directions. In this lesson, you'll learn how to distinguish stage directions from dialogue and what the most common directions mean.

Inferring Mood in Drama

8. Inferring Mood in Drama

When reading a play, the reader must figure out what the overall mood is using evidence found within the text. This lesson will teach you where to look in the script to find the clues to the mood.

Character Dialogue & Nonverbal Communication in a Drama

9. Character Dialogue & Nonverbal Communication in a Drama

Characters in plays have two ways of communicating with the audience and each other. They can use verbal or nonverbal forms of communication. In this lesson, you'll learn about how both are used in drama.

Character Motivation in a Drama

10. Character Motivation in a Drama

Motivation is a term that applies to many aspects of life. In this lesson, you'll apply the term to literature and learn how motivation functions in a play.

A Streetcar Named Desire: Summary and Analysis

11. A Streetcar Named Desire: Summary and Analysis

Learn about the controversial play 'A Streetcar Named Desire,' why it was so controversial, and why it is still considered a classic piece of American literature.

Arthur Miller: Biography and Major Plays

12. Arthur Miller: Biography and Major Plays

In this lesson, we will talk about the life of one of America's greatest playwrights, Arthur Miller. We will take a close look at his role in the American political scene of the 1950s and give insight into some of his most influential works.

Arthur Miller's The Crucible: Summary and Quotes

13. Arthur Miller's The Crucible: Summary and Quotes

What's Arthur Miller's play 'The Crucible' all about? Witches! Communists! Allegories! It's the Red Scare of the McCarthy era as told through the metaphor of the Salem witch trials of colonial America.

Tennessee Williams: Biography, Works, and Style

14. Tennessee Williams: Biography, Works, and Style

This lesson provides insight into the life, work and style of one of the most influential playwrights of our time, Tennessee Williams. His major works include 'A Streetcar Named Desire' and 'Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.'

The Glass Menagerie: Summary and Analysis

15. The Glass Menagerie: Summary and Analysis

Tennessee Williams' first big hit, 'The Glass Menagerie,' known as the memory play, fascinated audiences for its presentation of one man's vision of his past. This lesson will go into the basic plot of this story, as well as explore the major symbols and elements of style in the play.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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