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Ch 5: Drawing Conclusions & Communicating Scientific Ideas

About This Chapter

This overview of how to draw conclusions and communicate scientific ideas can teach you about presenting the scientific process in writing and avoiding plagiarism. The lessons in this chapter are valuable when preparing for a test or working on class assignments.

Drawing Conclusions & Communicating Scientific Ideas - Chapter Summary

In these lessons on how to draw conclusions and communicate scientific ideas, you can review how to modify scientific investigations based on evidence. You can also obtain a more lucid understanding of when to cite sources. By the end of the chapter, you should be positioned to:

  • Discus how to ensure evidence provided supports the scientists' conclusions
  • Explain how to use your data to revise your hypothesis
  • Provide instructions on how to write a conclusion for technical documents
  • Give a presentation on the scientific process
  • Define and provide examples of academic sources
  • Evaluate sources for research
  • Discuss how to avoid plagiarism

Expert instructors guide you through each lesson while providing a fun and engaging learning experience. Each video is accompanied by a full written transcript, which can be used as a fully text-based learning option. A concise quiz is available for each lesson to test your understanding of the concepts covered.

7 Lessons in Chapter 5: Drawing Conclusions & Communicating Scientific Ideas
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Understanding Whether Given Evidence Supports a Conclusion

1. Understanding Whether Given Evidence Supports a Conclusion

Part of being a good scientist is evaluating other scientists' work. One aspect of this is knowing whether the evidence provided supports the scientists' conclusions. While this is not always easy, it is necessary in order to produce good science.

Modifying Scientific Investigations Based on Evidence

2. Modifying Scientific Investigations Based on Evidence

In this lesson, we'll learn about how the evidence from your scientific investigation supports or refutes your hypothesis. We'll also go into how to use your data to revise your hypothesis and refine your experiment.

Conclusions of Technical Documents

3. Conclusions of Technical Documents

Technical writing should always end with a conclusion in order to provide readers with a final outcome of the presented data. This video explains why and how to write a conclusion for your technical documents.

Presenting the Scientific Process Orally or in Writing

4. Presenting the Scientific Process Orally or in Writing

Part of being a good scientist involves sharing your work with others. Two of the most common ways this is done is through written works and oral presentations, both of which require a certain amount of care and skill.

Academic Sources: Definition & Examples

5. Academic Sources: Definition & Examples

Find out what academic sources are and what to look for if you're required to use them for research papers and essays. Complete the lesson, and take a quiz to test your new knowledge.

Finding & Evaluating Sources for Research

6. Finding & Evaluating Sources for Research

Not everything you read on the Internet is true. This video will help you navigate through different online sources and evaluate the validity of those sources to ensure that you can trust the information you use as part of your research.

How to Avoid Plagiarism: When to Cite Sources

7. How to Avoid Plagiarism: When to Cite Sources

Plagiarism is a very serious matter in both academia and professional writing. Plagiarism in an academic setting can lead to you failing a course or being removed from school completely. Plagiarism in professional writing can lead to being fired from a job or finding yourself in court being sued. Let's figure out how to avoid this issue!

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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