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Ch 3: Elementary ELA: Reading Comprehension

About This Chapter

Complete this chapter to refresh your understanding of elementary English language arts reading comprehension methods. The chapter offers short lessons and assessments that can help you improve your instructional skills or study these topics for upcoming teacher certification exams.

Elementary ELA: Reading Comprehension - Chapter Summary

This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of reading comprehension instructional techniques for elementary-level English language arts curricula. Work through these engaging lessons at your own pace to review strategies for teaching young students how to read critically and comprehend different types of text. When you're finished with the chapter, you should be able to:

  • Differentiate between literal, evaluative and inferential reading comprehension
  • Utilize instruction and assessment techniques for reading comprehension
  • Use activities to teach students about point of view, oral language and reading comprehension
  • Show students how to use questioning techniques and graphic organizers
  • Explain the differences between close reading and big picture reading
  • Support informational text comprehension and identification of text structures
  • Integrate 3-minute pauses and think-alouds in the classroom
  • Define common literary devices and outline the elements of story maps

In addition to the lessons, this chapter offers supplemental resources that can enhance your studying experience. Take the quizzes and chapter exam to reinforce your understanding of these reading terms and instructional strategies. You can also print out the word-for-word lesson transcripts to underline key concepts and take notes as you review the lessons. Finally, you can use the Ask the Expert feature if you have any questions about these teaching techniques.

13 Lessons in Chapter 3: Elementary ELA: Reading Comprehension
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Reading Comprehension: Literal, Inferential & Evaluative

1. Reading Comprehension: Literal, Inferential & Evaluative

Reading comprehension involves three levels of understanding: literal meaning, inferential meaning, and evaluative meaning. This lesson will differentiate and define these three levels.

How to Teach Reading Comprehension

2. How to Teach Reading Comprehension

Teaching reading comprehension requires instilling in the learner the use of several strategies and skills. This lesson will focus on cognitive skills and notation strategies that will enhance reading comprehension.

Assessment Techniques for Reading Comprehension

3. Assessment Techniques for Reading Comprehension

Need to assess your students' reading ability? Not quite sure where to begin? This lesson describes several techniques reading teachers can use to assess students' reading comprehension.

Oral Language Activities & Reading Comprehension

4. Oral Language Activities & Reading Comprehension

A student's reading comprehension abilities can be difficult for any teacher to evaluate. This lesson discusses verbal strategies for assessing a student's comprehension level.

Close Reading vs. Big Picture Reading Strategies

5. Close Reading vs. Big Picture Reading Strategies

In this lesson, learn about two different approaches to reading a work of literature: big picture strategies and close reading strategies. Discover how these two perspectives can be put into practice through examples from the play 'Romeo and Juliet.'

Supporting Comprehension of Informational Texts

6. Supporting Comprehension of Informational Texts

Reading and comprehending informational texts is an important skill for students. This lesson will detail several strategies you can use to support student comprehension of these texts.

Teaching Questioning Techniques for Reading Comprehension

7. Teaching Questioning Techniques for Reading Comprehension

Students who know how to ask good questions can quickly grow their own comprehension abilities. In this lesson, you'll learn some techniques for teaching students how to ask questions that boost their own comprehension.

Teaching Reading: 3-Minute Pause & Think-Alouds

8. Teaching Reading: 3-Minute Pause & Think-Alouds

The three minute pause and think-alouds are reading strategies that help students become better readers. This lesson outlines what they are, how they work and how to use these techniques in classrooms.

What is a Story Map? - Definition & Examples

9. What is a Story Map? - Definition & Examples

A story map is a classroom strategy to assist students in learning the elements of literature. In this lesson, examples of various story maps will be shown, and we'll identify the strengths in each.

Using Graphic Organizers for Reading Comprehension

10. Using Graphic Organizers for Reading Comprehension

How do our students learn to organize their thoughts while reading? What is the best way to help students assess plot, characterization, literary devices, and theme? Learn about the use of graphic organizers for promoting reading comprehension.

Identifying the Structure of a Text

11. Identifying the Structure of a Text

In this lesson, we're going to spend some time learning how to identify the structure of a text. We'll identify some of the primary structures found in both fiction and nonfiction texts.

Literary Devices: Definition & Examples

12. Literary Devices: Definition & Examples

This lesson studies some of the more common literary devices found in literature. Devices studied include allusion, diction, epigraph, euphemism, foreshadowing, imagery, metaphor/simile, personification, point-of-view and structure.

Activities for Teaching Point of View

13. Activities for Teaching Point of View

Teaching students to understand things from different points of view is an important aspect of critical thinking. This lesson gives you some activities for teaching point of view.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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