Ch 4: Elements of a Crime

About This Chapter

Study the elements of crime with this convenient online chapter. The chapter can help you prepare for an upcoming criminal justice exam, or you can use these fun lessons and quizzes to supplement your class textbooks.

Elements of a Crime - Chapter Summary

Work through this chapter at your own pace to review the basic elements of crime. Containing bite-sized lessons, this chapter examines a variety of crime-related legal terms, as well as different types of crimes. You'll also take a look at concepts like strict liability, concurrence and attendant circumstances. In addition to the lessons, the chapter includes short quizzes that you can take to strengthen your knowledge. The chapter is also accessible on any device that has an Internet connection. By the end of the chapter, you should be equipped to:

  • Identify the elements of crime
  • Assess the legal definitions of concurrence, and causation
  • Explain the concept of attendant circumstances
  • Summarize the Burrage v. United States case
  • Differentiate between general and specific intent crimes
  • Recognize strict liability crimes

8 Lessons in Chapter 4: Elements of a Crime
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Elements of a Crime: Definition & Overview

1. The Elements of a Crime: Definition & Overview

The elements of a crime refer to the facts that must be established in order to prove criminal liability. This lesson discusses the four common elements of a crime and provides some examples of each.

Concurrence: Legal Definition & Exceptions

2. Concurrence: Legal Definition & Exceptions

Concurrence in the law is the requirement that a guilty mental state coincide with a guilty act. Learn about the general elements of a crime and the theory of concurrence as it relates to criminal law.

Attendant Circumstances: Definition, Concept & Examples

3. Attendant Circumstances: Definition, Concept & Examples

To convict a person of a crime, the prosecutor needs to prove the elements of that crime. In this lesson, we will learn what attendant circumstances are and what role they play in determining the elements of a crime.

Causation: Legal Definitions & Examples

4. Causation: Legal Definitions & Examples

When a criminal act is committed, the law requires certain basic elements to be proven before a person can be found guilty. In this lesson, we will define the element of criminal causation and provide examples of how it applies to a criminal case.

Burrage v. United States: Decision & Explanation

5. Burrage v. United States: Decision & Explanation

The Supreme Court case Burrage v. United States dealt with the causation requirement for a crime to have been committed. In this lesson, we'll examine the case and outcome as well as the 'but for' requirement.

General Intent Crimes: Definition & Examples

6. General Intent Crimes: Definition & Examples

A general intent crime is a crime that is committed with intent, but the results that happened were not proved to be intentional. This lesson discusses the varieties of general intent crimes.

Specific Intent Crimes: Definition & Examples

7. Specific Intent Crimes: Definition & Examples

In some criminal cases, the defendant's state of mind while committing the crime is important. In this lesson, you'll learn about specific intent crimes and what differentiates them from other types of crimes.

Strict Liability: Definition, Crimes & Examples

8. Strict Liability: Definition, Crimes & Examples

This lesson will teach you what constitutes a strict liability crime. Review the definition of strict liability and examine the various types of strict liability crimes. Then, look at some examples to gain a better understanding of this type of crime.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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