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Ch 7: Essay Writing: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Essay Writing chapter of this College Composition Help and Review course is the simplest way to master writing essays. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of essay writing.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering college composition material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn college-level composition. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding essay writing or working with editing and proofreading
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning composition (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about writing essays
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra composition learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Essay Writing chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Essay Writing chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any essay writing question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

In this chapter, you'll learn the answers to questions including:

  • How can I build on personal experiences?
  • What are some guidelines for synthesizing sources?
  • How can I maintain focus when writing for a targeted audience?
  • What guidelines should I follow when editing and proofreading?
  • How can I avoid logical fallacies and anticipate audience opposition?

14 Lessons in Chapter 7: Essay Writing: Help and Review
How to Write a Strong Personal Essay

1. How to Write a Strong Personal Essay

At some point, you may be required to write a personal essay. Watch this video to learn how to turn your personal experiences into an effective essay.

How to Write a Persuasive Essay and Use Several Sources

2. How to Write a Persuasive Essay and Use Several Sources

In a persuasive essay in which you cite multiple sources, it's important to strike the right balance and use your sources to support your points without depending on them too much. In this lesson, we'll cover how to use multiple sources effectively to support your argument while still fully developing your own ideas in a persuasive essay.

Writing for Your Audience

3. Writing for Your Audience

By understanding some fundamental characteristics about your audience, you can write more effectively and be in better control of how well your writing is received by that audience. This video explains the basic points that you should consider in order to provide more informative and more persuasive essays for your readers.

How to Edit and Improve Essay Content

4. How to Edit and Improve Essay Content

Going back through an essay that you've written in order to make substantive content improvements can be a daunting task. Fortunately, there are some basic principles that you can apply to whip your essay into shape.

What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

5. What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

Logical fallacies are flaws in reasoning that can throw your argument off track and confuse your reader. This video explains how to identify a few common logical fallacies and how to steer clear of them.

Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

6. Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

In addition to planning the major argumentative points you'll make when writing a persuasive paper, you should also think about potential opposing views. This video gives you tips for determining how to effectively anticipate and refute opposing views as you write your argument.

How to Focus Your Essay and Respond to the Essay Prompt

7. How to Focus Your Essay and Respond to the Essay Prompt

In this video, learn how to ensure that your writing responds directly to your assignment. Then find out how to spot where you may have strayed from the paper's point and how to get back on track.

Introduction Sentences for Essays: Examples & Overview

8. Introduction Sentences for Essays: Examples & Overview

Sometimes it is hard to know how to start an essay, but capturing a reader's attention is very important. In this lesson, we will explore various effective ways to begin essays, and also look at common mistakes to avoid.

Citation: Styles & Formats

9. Citation: Styles & Formats

Learn about citation styles and their formats. Find out how different citation styles should appear within an academic paper, then take a quiz to test your new knowledge.

The Intentional Fallacy: Summary & Concept

10. The Intentional Fallacy: Summary & Concept

'The Intentional Fallacy,' a 20th century article that proposes that a work of art's meaning is not tied to the intention of its creator, is one that has greatly shaped contemporary criticism. Learn more through a summary of its components, a comprehensive lesson, and a quiz.

How to Write a Composition

11. How to Write a Composition

Written compositions often play a large part in many secondary school and college courses. This lesson will walk you through the process of planning, writing, and editing your assigned composition.

How to Write a Compare & Contrast Essay

12. How to Write a Compare & Contrast Essay

What kind of essay now!? There are many kinds of essays, but in this lesson you will learn what a compare and contrast essay is and how to write one effectively.

How to Start a Comparison Essay: Outline & Thesis

13. How to Start a Comparison Essay: Outline & Thesis

A comparison essay allows you to share the relationship between two or more topics. Comparison is a good way to determine why something is the best or why something is popular.

Comparison Essays: Block & Point-by-Point Methods

14. Comparison Essays: Block & Point-by-Point Methods

In this lesson, we discuss the two major types of comparison essays: the block method and the point-by-point method. We also review the important concept of the transition paragraph.

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