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Ch 5: Evaluating Arguments and Reasoning: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Evaluating Arguments and Reasoning chapter of this CAHSEE English Exam: Help and Review course is the simplest way to master the ability to evaluate arguments and reasoning. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure you learn to confidently evaluate arguments and reasoning.

Who's It For?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering evaluating arguments and reasoning material will benefit from the lessons in this chapter. There is no faster or easier way to learn how to evaluate arguments and reasoning. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding ways to evaluate arguments and reasoning
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning English (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn how to evaluate arguments and reasoning
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra English learning resources

How It Works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Evaluating Arguments and Reasoning chapter exam.

Why It Works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Evaluating Arguments and Reasoning chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any evaluating arguments and reasoning question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students Will Review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in an evaluating arguments and reasoning unit of a standard CAHSEE English exam prep course. Topics covered include:

  • Ways to evaluate reasoning in an essay or article
  • How to identify an author's underlying assumptions
  • Recognizing statements that strengthen or weaken arguments
  • Identifying relationships between general and specific ideas
  • How to determine if facts or ideas are relevant in a reading selection
  • Understanding logical fallacies

5 Lessons in Chapter 5: Evaluating Arguments and Reasoning: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

1. Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

As you read essays and articles, your reading comprehension and understanding of each writing's purpose and key points are enhanced if you understand the author's reasoning and logic. Explore deductive and inductive reasoning processes and learn techniques for evaluating reasoning in an essay or article.

Identifying an Author's Underlying Assumptions

2. Identifying an Author's Underlying Assumptions

Whenever a writer puts pen to paper, chances are that he or she is making a number of assumptions about the reader. This lesson focuses on some of those assumptions and how to identify them.

How to Recognize Statements that Strengthen or Weaken Arguments

3. How to Recognize Statements that Strengthen or Weaken Arguments

Certain statements and how factual they are or how they are delivered can strengthen or weaken your argument. Learn more about the three elements of argument formulation and differences between strong and weak reasoning, and read examples.

How to Identify Relationships Between General & Specific Ideas

4. How to Identify Relationships Between General & Specific Ideas

To identify relationships between general and specific ideas, the specific idea must define the general idea proving its validity. Learn about general vs. specific ideas, discover the relationships between general and specific ideas, and see some examples.

Logical Fallacies: Appeals to Ignorance, Emotion or Popularity

5. Logical Fallacies: Appeals to Ignorance, Emotion or Popularity

Logical fallacies are a means of reasoning which are not based on pure facts. Discover three types of logical fallacies and how to avoid them, including appeal to ignorance, appeal to emotion, and appeal to popularity.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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More Exams
There are even more practice exams available in Evaluating Arguments and Reasoning: Help and Review.
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