Ch 7: Evaluating Informational Texts

About This Chapter

This chapter looks into informational texts, with lessons addressing what to keep in mind when reading them as well as how to use them in writing. You'll also examine relevant terms while breaking down their linguistic components.

Evaluating Informational Texts - Chapter Summary

This chapter revolves around techniques for getting the most out of informational texts. You'll review the different aspects of these texts and how they can affect meaning as well as how these materials can be referenced in your writing. As you study, you'll learn more about:

  • The characteristics of informational texts
  • Finding the main idea, purpose and audience of informational texts
  • Evaluating evidence in informational writing
  • Rhetorical styles of writing
  • Employing information found in technical and functional texts
  • Grouping ideas together
  • The impact of writing structure on meaning

The dashboard feature allows you to get a quick-view of your recent activity and progress through the chapter anytime, with links to practice quizzes and additional courses you can explore as a means of supplementing your learning. These quizzes can be taken as many times as you like and are also printable in worksheet form.

8 Lessons in Chapter 7: Evaluating Informational Texts
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Informational Text? - Definition, Characteristics & Examples

1. What is Informational Text? - Definition, Characteristics & Examples

This lesson will help you understand and identify all components of informational text. Learn more about informational text and see examples in this lesson.

How to Use Reference Material in Your Writing

2. How to Use Reference Material in Your Writing

When it comes to writing an essay or a vast array of other academic writing projects, you will often have to refer to the works of others. This video will teach you the skills to use reference materials in your writing.

Informational Texts: Main Idea, Purpose & Audience

3. Informational Texts: Main Idea, Purpose & Audience

This lesson describes what is and is not informational text. You'll discover the purpose, features, and audience of informational text. You'll also explore examples of informational text.

Assessing Evidence in Informational Writing

4. Assessing Evidence in Informational Writing

It's important to know what you're reading. In this lesson, we're going to examine the evidence in informational texts to learn whether it's valid or not.

Rhetorical Modes of Writing: Definition & Examples

5. Rhetorical Modes of Writing: Definition & Examples

If you've ever written anything, you've used rhetoric. Examine the most common modes in rhetorical writing and learn how you can use them in your life.

Using Information in Technical & Functional Texts

6. Using Information in Technical & Functional Texts

This lesson describes scenarios when you can use technical and functional texts. You'll learn what they are and how they fit into our everyday lives, including situations when their use is critical.

Organizing and Categorizing Ideas, Concepts and Information

7. Organizing and Categorizing Ideas, Concepts and Information

In this lesson, you will learn clear, simple ways to group your ideas together. First, you'll figure out what the paper is about, and then the rest is easy!

What is Structure in Writing and How Does it Affect Meaning?

8. What is Structure in Writing and How Does it Affect Meaning?

In this lesson, we will define the role of structure in literature. From there, we will look at the different ways to structure fiction and how it affects the meaning.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support