Copyright

Ch 3: Evaluating Written Arguments

About This Chapter

Feel confident that you understand how to evaluate written arguments using this chapter's helpful study resources. Entertaining lessons, short quizzes and a practice exam can strengthen your comprehension of this subject and enhance your ability to excel on an upcoming test.

Evaluating Written Arguments - Chapter Summary

The short lessons in this chapter closely examine the basics of evaluating written arguments. Study logical fallacies, ways to analyze literary passages, the critical thinking process and more with help from our expert instructors. After completing this chapter, you will have the knowledge to:

  • Describe the critical thinking process
  • Analyze a literary passage
  • Interpret and analyze an article
  • Define, identify and avoid logical fallacies
  • Recognize hasty generalizations, appeals to ignorance and other types of logical fallacies
  • Compare and contrast elements of a passage
  • Evaluate reasoning in an article or essay
  • Determine when sources are reliable, credible and worthy

The lessons in this chapter are accessible around-the-clock and can be viewed using any smartphone, tablet or computer. Review any of the lessons that will help you better understand how to evaluate written arguments, and visit them as often as necessary. Each lesson is available as a short video or full transcript and features a multiple-choice quiz you can use to test your knowledge of its contents. Our practice exam enables you to gauge your knowledge of the entire chapter.

9 Lessons in Chapter 3: Evaluating Written Arguments
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Critical Thinking Process: Point-of-View, Assumptions, Evidence & Conclusions

1. The Critical Thinking Process: Point-of-View, Assumptions, Evidence & Conclusions

In this lesson, you'll learn the steps involved in the critical thinking process. You'll consider how coming to a conclusion effectively involves multiple questions that get you thinking about a topic in a new way.

How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

2. How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

In this lesson, we will examine the steps involved in the basic analysis of literature. Then, using a well-known fable, we will go through each step of analysis: comprehension, interpreting and drawing conclusions.

Practice Analyzing and Interpreting an Article

3. Practice Analyzing and Interpreting an Article

When reading news articles, we often get caught up in the drama, but in order to analyze an article we need to look at it differently. In this lesson, we'll discuss exactly how to do that.

What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

4. What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

Logical fallacies are flaws in reasoning that can throw your argument off track and confuse your reader. This video explains how to identify a few common logical fallacies and how to steer clear of them.

Logical Fallacies: Hasty Generalization, Circular Reasoning, False Cause & Limited Choice

5. Logical Fallacies: Hasty Generalization, Circular Reasoning, False Cause & Limited Choice

Watch this video lesson to see how you can identify cases where logic is not sound. Learn the characteristic traits of hasty generalization, circular reasoning, false cause, and limited choice.

Logical Fallacies: Appeals to Ignorance, Emotion or Popularity

6. Logical Fallacies: Appeals to Ignorance, Emotion or Popularity

Watch this video lesson to see examples of the logical fallacies of appeals to ignorance, emotion, and popularity. You will also see how to identify them.

How to Compare and Contrast Elements of a Passage

7. How to Compare and Contrast Elements of a Passage

In this lesson, you'll learn how to compare and contrast when analyzing pieces of literature. You will also learn different strategies to assist in identifying key similarities and differences when applying compare and contrast.

Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

8. Evaluating Reasoning in an Essay or Article

Being able to effectively evaluate reasoning can be helpful to you as you develop your own deductive and inductive reasoning skills and put those skills to work in persuasive essays. This lesson sheds some light on how to evaluate reasoning.

Evaluating Sources for Reliability, Credibility, and Worth

9. Evaluating Sources for Reliability, Credibility, and Worth

It's important to have information that is reliable, credible, and worthwhile in your speech. Sometimes, it's hard to determine these factors. This lesson will help you!

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support