Ch 2: Exceptional Student Characteristics

About This Chapter

If you need some assistance understanding exceptional student characteristics, we've created this engaging chapter just for you. Whether you're studying for a test or just trying to catch up in class, these short lessons are mobile friendly and accessible to you 24 hours a day.

Exceptional Student Characteristics - Chapter Summary

Take a look at this helpful chapter to review exceptional student characteristics at your convenience. The lessons you'll find here cover topics including students with special talents and gifts, physical disabilities or other health impairments, learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities and students with communication disorders. Once you finish this chapter, you should be able to complete the following:

  • Discuss characteristics of students with autism spectrum disorders
  • Outline issues for students who are hard of hearing or deaf
  • Adapt instruction for leaners with cognitive and social functioning delays
  • Detail accommodations for students with dual-sensory impairment
  • Outline approaches for students with behavioral or emotional disorders
  • Describe the characteristics for homebound or hospitalized students
  • Teach students with traumatic brain injuries
  • Identify the needs of students who are blind or have low vision

You'll find the resources you need in this chapter to learn or review these topics thoroughly. Our expert instructors created each lesson with your ease of use and understanding in mind. Experts are available to answer any questions that you might have when you submit them through the Dashboard.

12 Lessons in Chapter 2: Exceptional Student Characteristics
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Students with Special Gifts & Talents

1. Students with Special Gifts & Talents

Working with students who have special gifts and talents can not only be exciting and invigorating but also challenging. This lesson gives you some insight into these students' characteristics and needs.

Students with Physical Disabilities & Other Health Impairments

2. Students with Physical Disabilities & Other Health Impairments

Students with physical disabilities and other health impairments have unique needs. This lesson will discuss the specifics of life with a physical disability or health impairment and will end with a brief quiz to see what you have learned.

Students with Learning Disabilities

3. Students with Learning Disabilities

Working with students who have learning disabilities requires a unique awareness along with special accommodations. This lesson explores the issues faced by learning disabled students.

Students with Intellectual Disabilities

4. Students with Intellectual Disabilities

Students with intellectual disabilities have unique characteristics and special needs. This lesson defines and explains the concept of intellectual disability and considers how these students may interact and learn differently in the classroom.

Students with Communication Disorders

5. Students with Communication Disorders

Students with communication disorders have unique needs and may have issues with speech, language, hearing, or processing. This lesson will explore communication disorders in students and will end with a brief quiz to see what you have learned.

Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

6. Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

This lesson will highlight issues that are relevant to teachers of students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including causes, diagnosis, education and transition into adulthood. A short quiz will follow to test your knowledge.

Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

7. Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Working with students who are deaf or hard of hearing requires a unique awareness along with special accommodations. This lesson explores the issues faced by the deaf and hard of hearing student.

Cognitive & Social Functioning Delays: Adapting Instruction for Learners

8. Cognitive & Social Functioning Delays: Adapting Instruction for Learners

When growing up, keeping pace with your classmates can be difficult, but for some it's much harder than others. In this lesson we will explore cognitive and social developmental milestones in terms of the developmental delays that affect school-age children.

Students with Dual-Sensory Impairment: Characteristics & Accommodations

9. Students with Dual-Sensory Impairment: Characteristics & Accommodations

Typically, students learn by watching and listening to their teachers. Because students with dual-sensory impairment cannot learn in these ways, teachers must make accommodations. This lesson describes challenges and accommodations for students with dual-sensory impairment.

Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

10. Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders

Working with students who have emotional or behavioral disorders requires a unique awareness along with special accommodations. This lesson will explore the issues faced by these students and will end with a brief quiz to see what you have learned.

Teaching Students with Traumatic Brain Injury

11. Teaching Students with Traumatic Brain Injury

Imagine waking up one day unable to remember what happened the day before, or having a difficult time reading a book. This lesson will explore a few teaching strategies that might help a student with a traumatic brain injury.

Students Who Are Blind or Have Low Vision

12. Students Who Are Blind or Have Low Vision

Working with students who are blind or have low vision requires a unique awareness along with special accommodations. This lesson will explore the issues faced by blind and low vision students and will end with a brief quiz to see what you have learned.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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