Ch 1: Experimental Chemistry and Introduction to Matter Lesson Plans

About This Chapter

The Experimental Chemistry and Introduction to Matter chapter of this course is designed to help you plan and teach the foundations of chemistry in your classroom. The video lessons, quizzes and transcripts can easily be adapted to provide your lesson plans with engaging and dynamic educational content. Make planning your course easier by using our syllabus as a guide.

Weekly Syllabus

Below is a sample breakdown of the Experimental Chemistry and Introduction to Matter chapter into a 5-day school week. Based on the pace of your course, you may need to adapt the lesson plan to fit your needs.

DayTopicsKey Terms and Concepts Covered
Monday The metric system and dimensional analysis Meter, -meter, kilo-, centi-, milli-, mass, balance, weight, volume, liter, density, Celsius, Kelvin; factor-label method, conversion factor
Tuesday Significant figures and scientific notation Precision, converting, standard notation, exponent
Wednesday Chemistry lab equipment Balance, mortar and pestle, beaker, Erlenmeyer flask, volumetric flask, graduated cylinder, burette, evaporating dish, hot plate, Bunsen burner, ring stand, crucible, test tube, desiccator
Thursday Matter: states and changes Phase change, solids, liquids, gases, physical change, chemical change, chemical reactions
Friday Separating chemical mixtures Homogeneous, heterogeneous, manually separate, magnetism, dissolve, filtration, evaporation, crystallization, distillation, chromatography, capillary action, retention factor

7 Lessons in Chapter 1: Experimental Chemistry and Introduction to Matter Lesson Plans
The Metric System: Units and Conversion

1. The Metric System: Units and Conversion

Just like you and your friend communicate using the same language, scientists all over the world need to use the same language when reporting the measurements they make. This language is called the metric system. In this lesson we will cover the metric units for length, mass, volume, density and temperature, and also discuss how to convert among them.

Unit Conversion and Dimensional Analysis

2. Unit Conversion and Dimensional Analysis

How is solving a chemistry problem like playing dominoes? Watch this lesson to find out how you can use your domino skills to solve almost any chemistry problem.

Significant Figures and Scientific Notation

3. Significant Figures and Scientific Notation

Are 7.5 grams and 7.50 grams the same? How do scientists represent very large and very small quantities? Find out the answers to these questions in this video.

Chemistry Lab Equipment: Supplies, Glassware & More

4. Chemistry Lab Equipment: Supplies, Glassware & More

When you bake a cake, you use different tools for each step in the process: a bowl for mixing, cups for measuring ingredients and an oven for baking. In this lesson, you will discover the name and purpose of many of the different tools that are used in the chemistry lab.

Matter: Physical and Chemical Properties

5. Matter: Physical and Chemical Properties

How are substances identified? There are two major ways we can describe a substance: physical properties and chemical properties. Learn about how chemists use properties to classify matter as either a mixture or a pure substance.

States of Matter and Chemical Versus Physical Changes to Matter

6. States of Matter and Chemical Versus Physical Changes to Matter

The world around us is constantly changing. Chemists put those changes into two main categories: physical changes and chemical changes. This lesson will define and provide examples of each.

Chromatography, Distillation and Filtration: Methods of Separating Mixtures

7. Chromatography, Distillation and Filtration: Methods of Separating Mixtures

What are some ways that mixtures can be separated? Watch this video to explore several examples of ways you can separate a mixture into its individual components.

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