Ch 12: Experimental Design: Homework Help

About This Chapter

The Experimental Design chapter of this Research Methods in Psychology Homework Help course helps students complete their experimental design homework and earn better grades. This homework help resource uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long.

How it works:

  • Identify which concepts are covered on your experimental design homework.
  • Find videos on those topics within this chapter.
  • Watch fun videos, pausing and reviewing as needed.
  • Complete sample questions and get instant feedback.
  • Finish your experimental design homework with ease!

Topics from your homework you'll be able to complete:

  • Between-subjects designs
  • Random assignment in research
  • Control groups and various group designs
  • Factorial design
  • Multivariate experimental design
  • Within-subject designs
  • Carryover effects and control methods
  • Advantages and disadvantages of different experimental designs

15 Lessons in Chapter 12: Experimental Design: Homework Help
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Between-Subjects Designs: Definition & Examples

1. Between-Subjects Designs: Definition & Examples

Many times in research, a psychologist wants to look at two or more groups to see which condition works best. In this lesson, we'll look at some of the strengths and weaknesses of the between-subjects design and how to form equivalent groups.

Random Assignment in Research: Definition and Importance

2. Random Assignment in Research: Definition and Importance

In order to get the most accurate results, researchers must choose and assign their subjects in a random manner. In this lesson, we'll look at random assignment, random selection, and why they are important.

What is a Control Group? - Definition and Use in Research

3. What is a Control Group? - Definition and Use in Research

In research, many times a condition is compared to a group that doesn't receive treatment. In this lesson, we'll look at what a control group is and why it is important.

Two-Group Experimental Designs: Definition & Examples

4. Two-Group Experimental Designs: Definition & Examples

How does a researcher know if their treatment has an effect or not? In this lesson, we'll look at two-group experimental designs, contrast control and treatment groups, and examine random assignment and matched groups.

Matched-Group Design: Definition & Examples

5. Matched-Group Design: Definition & Examples

Choosing how to divide subjects into groups is a major part of experimental design. In this lesson, we'll look at a type of non-random assignment, matched-group design, and its strengths and limitations.

Multiple Group Design: Definition & Examples

6. Multiple Group Design: Definition & Examples

What happens when a researcher has many groups in their study? In this lesson, we'll look closer at multiple-group design, including multiple-group design with independent groups and multiple-group design with correlated groups.

What is Factorial Design? - Definition & Example

7. What is Factorial Design? - Definition & Example

The simplest studies involve one independent and one dependent variable. But what happens when a researcher wants to study more than one independent variable? In this lesson, we'll look closer at factorial design in research.

Factorial Design Variations

8. Factorial Design Variations

When a study has more than one factor, it is called a factorial design. In this lesson, we'll go through different variations on factorial designs, including those involving factor levels and those involving between- or within-groups measurement.

Interactions in Factorial Design

9. Interactions in Factorial Design

When a study has a factorial design, the two independent variables can interact with each other to affect the dependent variable. In this lesson, we'll look at what interactions are, what they look like, and what a crossover interaction is.

Main Effects in Factorial Design

10. Main Effects in Factorial Design

When you have more than one independent variable, sometimes you want to look at how they work independent of each other. In this lesson, we'll examine main effects in factorial design and how they differ from interactions.

Multivariate Experimental Design

11. Multivariate Experimental Design

Most research studies only have one dependent variable. But what if a researcher wants to study more than one dependent variable? In this lesson, we'll look at multivariate research designs and how they differ from factorial designs.

Within-Subject Designs: Definition, Types & Examples

12. Within-Subject Designs: Definition, Types & Examples

Sometimes a researcher wants to look at how each subject does at different points during a study. In this lesson, we'll look at some of the strengths and weaknesses of a within-subjects design and how to counterbalance subjects for a stronger study.

Carryover Effects & How They Can Be Controlled Through Counterbalancing

13. Carryover Effects & How They Can Be Controlled Through Counterbalancing

Within-subjects research has a lot of advantages, but one disadvantage is the possibility of carryover effects. In this lesson, we'll examine carryover effects and how they can be controlled through a counterbalanced design.

Small n Designs: ABA & Multiple-Baseline Designs

14. Small n Designs: ABA & Multiple-Baseline Designs

When planning a study, the size of the sample can influence the results of the study. To get around this, some researchers choose a research design specifically meant for small sample sizes. In this lesson, we'll look at some small 'n' designs.

Advantages & Disadvantages of Various Experimental Designs

15. Advantages & Disadvantages of Various Experimental Designs

There are many different options for researchers when deciding how to run a study. In this lesson, we'll look at some of the advantages and disadvantages of some common experimental designs.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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