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Ch 14: Figurative Language: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Figurative Language chapter of this NY Regents Exam - Comprehensive English Help and Review course is the simplest way to master figurative language. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of figurative language.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering comprehensive English material for the NY Regents Exam will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn comprehensive English. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding figurative language techniques and types
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning English (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about figurative language
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra English learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the figurative language chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the figurative language chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any figurative language question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

This chapter helps students review the concepts in a figurative language unit of a standard NY Regents Exam - Comprehensive English course. Topics covered include:

  • Metaphors and similes
  • Types of narrators
  • Allusion and illusion
  • Types of irony
  • Cliches, paradoxes and equivocations
  • Personification and apostrophe
  • Foreshadowing types
  • Analogy
  • Hyperbole
  • Alliteration

11 Lessons in Chapter 14: Figurative Language: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

1. What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

Metaphors, whether extended or mixed are commonly used to communicate ideas and emotions. Although similar, they play a very different role in language than similes. Take a moment to master the differences between these literary tools and learn when and how to apply each.

Narrators in Literature: Types and Definitions

2. Narrators in Literature: Types and Definitions

In a literary work, narration is the 'point of view' from which the story is told. Discover examples and types of narration including omniscient, limited, and objective, as well as how each affects the scope and meaning of a story.

Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

3. Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

While the words allusion and illusion may sound similar, they are not actually closely related to each other. Learn more about the definitions and examples of allusion (a literary term for an indirect reference to another person, work, person, place or event) and illusion (experiencing - seeing, hearing, tasting, touching, smelling - something that isn't really there).

Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

4. Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

Irony is a literary device used in novels, plays, songs, and even everyday communication to humorously or emphatically react when reality does not meet expectations. Explore the definitions and examples of irony, and learn about the types of irony, including verbal, situational, and dramatic.

Cliches, Paradoxes & Equivocations: Definitions & Examples

5. Cliches, Paradoxes & Equivocations: Definitions & Examples

Cliches, paradoxes, and equivocations can be useful writing tools that strengthen documents when used appropriately. Learn the definitions of cliches, paradoxes, and equivocations, and explore examples of how to use them.

Personification and Apostrophe: Differences & Examples

6. Personification and Apostrophe: Differences & Examples

Personification and apostrophe are literary devices that either describe or address non-human objects and ideas as if they were a person. Learn the differences between personification and apostrophe along with examples.

What is Foreshadowing? - Types, Examples & Definitions

7. What is Foreshadowing? - Types, Examples & Definitions

Authors of many different genres use foreshadowing to clue the reader in about future events in the story. Learn about several types of foreshadowing, including forms of direct foreshadowing, such as omens and prophecies commonly used in classic dramas, intentional misdirects like red herrings, and subtle foreshadowing, such as Chekhov's Gun and symbolic foreshadowing, which are seen more in contemporary works.

Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

8. Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

A simile is a comparison of two things that are not alike. Learn the definition of simile, and explore examples of similes to understand how similes are used in literature. Review epic similes, compare similes to metaphors, and recognize the limitations of similes.

Literal Language: Definition & Examples

9. Literal Language: Definition & Examples

Literal language means what it says, using the exact definition or denotation of a word. Learn how to define literal language, explore its differences from figurative language, review literal translation, and consider examples of its use.

Pun in Literature: Definition & Examples

10. Pun in Literature: Definition & Examples

A pun is a play on words that is used to make a written work more upbeat and witty. Examine detailed examples of what makes a pun and how it can make literature more interesting.

Literal vs. Figurative Language

11. Literal vs. Figurative Language

Writers frequently use different types of language to get their points across. Learn about literal and figurative language and explore their differences through some examples.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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More Exams
There are even more practice exams available in Figurative Language: Help and Review.
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