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Ch 5: Figurative Language & Nuance: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.5

About This Chapter

Find lessons for eleventh and twelfth grade English. The following lessons meet the Common Core Language standard for understanding word relationships, nuances and figurative language (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.5).

Standard: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances in word meanings.

About This Chapter

After mastering this standard, students will be able to interpret and analyze different types of word relationships, nuances and figurative language that include euphemisms, similes, allusions, clichés and metaphors.

Lessons in this standard cover concepts such as:

  • How to spot a euphemism
  • Differentiating metonymy and synecdoche
  • Comprehending various types of similes
  • Understanding the difference between allusions and illusions
  • Identifying and determining irony and sarcasm
  • Explaining differences in equivocations, clichés and paradoxes

Students can show their mastery of these concepts through reading and analyzing intricate forms of literature. After mastering these concepts, students will be able identify the true meanings of passages in literature and add flair to personal writings.

How to Use These Lessons in Your Classroom

Read the following information for tips to use when instructing students in the CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.5 standard.

Overall Concept Demonstration Lessons

Have students watch video lessons demonstrating the meaning and representation of the various types of word relationships, figurative language and nuances. Allow students to have a few minutes to write down commonly used examples. Call on students to have them share concept types and examples.

Passage Analysis Lessons

As a class, watch the word relationship, figurative language and nuance video lessons. Have the class read over a short literary passage that features several topics found in the video lessons. While discussing the literary passage, ask the students to identify relevant passage examples corresponding to video lesson content. They also need to explain their example's true meaning.

Figurative Language and Nuance Application Lessons

Provide students with a short story that doesn't use any figurative language or nuances. Exhibit all video lessons detailing figurative language and nuance use to the class. Give class time to rewrite the short story while incorporating at least three concepts found through the video lessons.

10 Lessons in Chapter 5: Figurative Language & Nuance: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.5
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Euphemism: Definition & Examples

1. Euphemism: Definition & Examples

This lesson defines euphemisms, alternate language used in place of offensive language or when discussing taboo topics. Explore some examples of euphemisms in everyday language and well-known examples from literature.

What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

2. What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

Metaphors are all around you. They're the bright sparkling lights that turn plain evergreens into Christmas trees. Learn how to spot them, why writers write with them, and how to use them yourself right here.

Synecdoche vs. Metonymy: Definitions & Examples

3. Synecdoche vs. Metonymy: Definitions & Examples

Would you lend your ears for a moment (or at least your eyeballs)? This lesson will explain what synecdoche and metonymy mean and how to spot them in a piece of prose or poetry.

Cliches, Paradoxes & Equivocations: Definitions & Examples

4. Cliches, Paradoxes & Equivocations: Definitions & Examples

Learn about cliches, paradoxes, and equivocations, and how they can weaken or strengthen certain types of writing. Explore examples of all three from literature and daily life.

Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

5. Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

Explore the simile and how, through comparison, it is used as a shorthand to say many things at once. Learn the difference between similes and metaphors, along with many examples of both.

Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

6. Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

Discover, once and for all, what irony is and is not. Explore three types of irony: verbal, situational and dramatic, and learn about some famous and everyday examples.

Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

7. Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

Allusions and illusions have little in common besides the fact that they sound similar. Learn the difference between the two and how allusions are an important part of literature and writing - and how to spot them in text.

What Is Nuance in Reading?

8. What Is Nuance in Reading?

Sometimes, the way something is written can change its very ideas. During this lesson, we'll examine nuance, or subtle differences in meaning, and how elements like connotation and subtext can create a nuanced piece.

How to Recognize and Use Oxymorons

9. How to Recognize and Use Oxymorons

In this lesson, we will define the figure of speech called an oxymoron and look at several examples. We will then discuss how to recognize oxymorons and use them correctly in writing.

What Is a Figure of Speech?

10. What Is a Figure of Speech?

In this lesson, we will define figure of speech and explain why it is important in your writing. After this definition, we will examine the more common figure of speeches and look at some examples.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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