Ch 34: Forensic Chemistry Overview

About This Chapter

Use these lessons to quickly review the uses and fields of forensic chemistry in preparation for class or an exam. Each lesson includes a self-assessment quiz that allows you to test what you have learned from it.

Forensic Chemistry Overview - Chapter Summary

Forensic chemistry is a field of applied science that utilizes chemical concepts in a legal setting. These lessons can help you better understand what forensic chemistry is and the different subfields within it. You will begin by exploring some applications of forensic chemistry as well as basic techniques used by chemists. Lessons then go over basic chemical concepts and how they are used forensically. Organic and inorganic chemistry, carbohydrates, proteins, atomic structures and the functional groups used in forensic chemistry are also reviewed. Once finished, you should know how to:

  • Define forensic chemistry and explain how it is used
  • Compare organic and inorganic chemistry
  • Identify the major functional groups in organic chemistry
  • Explain how alcohols and alkanols are classified
  • Discuss sugar molecules, including reducing and non-reducing sugars
  • Describe how the structure and functions of carbohydrates and proteins
  • Identify atomic and line emission spectrums

All of the lessons in this chapter were created by professional instructors and combine convenience with high quality information. Each lesson is followed by an interactive quiz, allowing you to make sure you understood the key points of the lesson. You can study whenever you find the time, on a wide variety of devices, as the Dashboard feature of your account keeps track of all your progress.

14 Lessons in Chapter 34: Forensic Chemistry Overview
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Forensic Chemistry: Definition & Overview

1. Forensic Chemistry: Definition & Overview

In this lesson, you will find an overview of a forensic chemist's job. You will learn the precautions that forensic chemists must take, ethical issues they should consider, and the influence of analytical chemistry and technology on investigations.

Forensic Chemistry & Technology: Uses & Examples

2. Forensic Chemistry & Technology: Uses & Examples

In this lesson, you will learn about the field of forensic chemistry. Several types of technology used in forensic chemistry, and the methods used to best utilize it, will also be discussed.

Inorganic vs. Organic Chemistry

3. Inorganic vs. Organic Chemistry

The study of chemicals is a very specific branch of science, but chemistry can be divided even further into separate fields, two of which are organic and inorganic. In this lesson, we'll explore the differences between these two fields of chemistry.

Functional Groups in Organic Molecules

4. Functional Groups in Organic Molecules

Learn what an organic compound is and how their functional groups affect them. Identify the different types of functional groups including alcohols, alkyl halides, ketones, aldehydes, ethers, carboxylic acids and esters.

Alcohols & Alkanols: Classification & Functional Group

5. Alcohols & Alkanols: Classification & Functional Group

At first glance, the term alcohol and alkanol sound quite similar. In fact, there are similarities between both compounds. Explore this lesson to learn about alcohols and alkanols, how they are classified, and what their functional groups are.

Structure and Function of Carbohydrates

6. Structure and Function of Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are found in many foods that we eat and may be found as sugars, starches, or fiber. Learn more about these three distinct types of carbohydrates, and how they are distinguished through their chemical structures in this lesson.

Carbohydrates Composition: Plants vs. Animals

7. Carbohydrates Composition: Plants vs. Animals

In this lesson, we will learn about carbohydrates in plants and animals. We will particularly learn about starch (amylopectin and amylose), cellulose, and glycogen.

Sugar Molecule: Structure & Formula

8. Sugar Molecule: Structure & Formula

Sugar molecules are also known as carbohydrates. You have likely heard of simple and complex carbohydrates, but what is the difference? This lesson discusses the basic structure of sugars and how they combine to form complex carbohydrates.

Reducing vs. Non-Reducing Sugars: Definition & Comparison

9. Reducing vs. Non-Reducing Sugars: Definition & Comparison

In this lesson, we'll learn about reducing and non-reducing sugars. We'll learn how to identify a reducing sugar and explore some reactions that involve them.

Proteins I: Structure and Function

10. Proteins I: Structure and Function

We need our proteins, not just as a major food group but for the many useful roles that they play in our bodies. In our introductory lesson to proteins, you'll learn about the many functions we rely on them to perform.

Proteins II: Amino Acids, Polymerization and Peptide Bonds

11. Proteins II: Amino Acids, Polymerization and Peptide Bonds

In this lesson, we'll take a deeper look at amino acids. You'll learn what makes a peptide, and what separates a protein from other kinds of amino acid bonds.

Proteins III: Structure and Characteristics of the 20 Amino Acids

12. Proteins III: Structure and Characteristics of the 20 Amino Acids

How do amino acids form the intricate polypeptide chains found in proteins? It's a matter of chemistry. Join glycine, a special amino acid, as she sizes up the other amino acids.

Atomic Spectrum: Definition, Absorption & Emission

13. Atomic Spectrum: Definition, Absorption & Emission

In this lesson, we'll discuss the meaning of the term 'atomic spectrum' and distinguish between the two main types of atomic spectra: absorption and emission spectra. We'll also describe how each forms.

Line Emission Spectrum: Definition & Uses

14. Line Emission Spectrum: Definition & Uses

How can astronomers determine the composition of stars that are light-years away? In this lesson we will describe the phenomena of line emission spectra and how this can be used as element identification, even from a great distance.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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