Ch 9: Foundations of Society: Intro to Sociology Lesson Plans

About This Chapter

The Foundations of Society chapter of this course is designed to help you plan and teach the basic premises of sociology in your classroom. The video lessons, quizzes and transcripts can easily be adapted to provide your lesson plans with engaging and dynamic educational content. Make planning your course easier by using our syllabus as a guide.

Weekly Syllabus

Below is a sample breakdown of the Foundations of Society chapter to fit into a school week. Based on the pace of your course, you may need to adapt the lesson plan to fit your needs.

Day Topic Key Terms and Concepts Covered
MondayCulture;
What constitutes culture?
Definition of culture, differences between material and nonmaterial cultures, meaning of culture, society and nature;
Symbols, values, languages and values
Tuesday Subsets of culture;
Cultural perceptions
High culture, popular culture, counterculture, multiculturalism;
Differences in ideal and real culture, definitions of ethnocentrism and cultural relativism
Wednesday Cultural analysis;
Socialization
Three theories regarding the analysis of culture;
Definition of socialization and how it differs from social isolation
Thursday Agents of socialization;
Social interaction theory
Means of socialization such as family, schools and the mass media;
Definition of status, what is meant by ascribed, achieved and master status
Friday Social roles;
Presentation of self
Types of social roles, such as role set and role strain;
Ways to present the self, including nonverbal communication and idealization

10 Lessons in Chapter 9: Foundations of Society: Intro to Sociology Lesson Plans
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Agents of Socialization: Family, Schools, Peers and Media

1. Agents of Socialization: Family, Schools, Peers and Media

The socialization that we receive in childhood has a lasting effect on our ability to interact with others in society. In this lesson, we identify and discuss four of the most influential agents of socialization in childhood: family, school, peers, and media.

Cultural Analysis: Theoretical Approaches

2. Cultural Analysis: Theoretical Approaches

In this lesson, we cover three theoretical approaches used by sociologists to analyze culture: structural-functional theory, social-conflict theory, and sociobiology. We define and discuss each theory, along with examples.

Cultural Subsets: High Culture, Popular Culture, Subculture, Counterculture & Multiculturalism

3. Cultural Subsets: High Culture, Popular Culture, Subculture, Counterculture & Multiculturalism

In this lesson, we identify several categories of cultures that can exist within a large culture. We define and discuss subcultures, high culture versus popular culture, and countercultures. We also discuss the view of multiculturalism in the U.S.

Elements of Culture: Explanation of the Major Elements That Define Culture

4. Elements of Culture: Explanation of the Major Elements That Define Culture

Culture combines many elements to create a unique way of living for different people. In this lesson, we identify four of the elements that exist in every culture, albeit in different forms: symbols, language, values, and norms. We also differentiate between folkways and mores.

Perceptions of Culture: Ideal Culture and Real Culture, Ethnocentrism, & Culture Relativism

5. Perceptions of Culture: Ideal Culture and Real Culture, Ethnocentrism, & Culture Relativism

The way we perceive culture - both our own and that of others - is affected by many things. In this lesson, we define and discuss the difference between perceptions of ideal culture and real culture. We also examine ethnocentrism and compare it to the idea of culture relativism.

Presentation of Self: Methods to Presenting The Self

6. Presentation of Self: Methods to Presenting The Self

All of us like to present ourselves to others as someone who is likable and successful. In this lesson, we discuss the concept of dramaturgical analysis as proposed by Erving Goffman. We also talk about the practice of idealization and how nonverbal communication can sometimes sabotage our presentation efforts.

Social Interaction Theory: Ascribed, Achieved & Master Status

7. Social Interaction Theory: Ascribed, Achieved & Master Status

In this lesson, we discuss social interaction theory, putting particular emphasis on the concept of social statuses. We identify and define several types of statuses, including ascribed, achieved, and master status.

Social Roles: Definition and Types of Social Roles

8. Social Roles: Definition and Types of Social Roles

This lesson focuses on the roles that society socially constructs. We define social roles and identify examples. We also examine types of social roles and what can happen with them, including role conflict, role strain, and role exit.

Socialization and Social Isolation: Definition & Case Studies

9. Socialization and Social Isolation: Definition & Case Studies

Interestingly, socialization seems to be the process that makes us act human. Here, we define socialization and discuss its importance to human development. We also contrast it to social isolation and discuss several case studies regarding what happens when humans don't or can't socialize.

What Is Culture? - Material and Nonmaterial Culture

10. What Is Culture? - Material and Nonmaterial Culture

Culture is a huge topic of study for sociologists. In this lesson, we define culture and distinguish between material and nonmaterial culture. As culture, nation, and society are often used interchangeably, we also distinguish between these three concepts.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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