Ch 5: FSA - Grade 7 ELA: Interpreting Literature

About This Chapter

Reading a selection of literature is just the beginning. In this chapter, your student can review the ways to interpret a literary passage and get prepared for the FSA Grade 7 ELA exam.

FSA - Grade 7 ELA: Interpreting Literature

Interpreting literature is one of the core components of an English class, and knowing how to draw ideas out of passages will be a helpful to your student when they take the FSA - Grade 7 ELA test. This chapter of video lessons the processes for analyzing and interpreting literature and text passages. Topics included in this chapter are as follows:

  • Interpreting meaning
  • Forming a point of view
  • Interpreting poetic themes
  • Elements of poetry
  • Historical fiction
  • Examples of intertextuality
  • Analyzing based on theme or topic
  • Film and stage vs. text
  • Visualization strategies
  • Parallelism

These videos use a timeline feature that makes it simple to watch each section in any order your student prefers, and they won't have to worry about missing out on any material. They can also take the self-assessment quizzes included with each lesson to track their progress and figure out how prepared they are for the exam.

FSA - Grade 7 ELA: Interpreting Literature Chapter Objectives

The Florida Standards Assessment exams track the progress of students throughout many different grade levels, from 3 to 10. The FSA - Grade 7 English Arts test includes questions on reading, language and listening. Questions related to the interpreting literature topics in this chapter can be found in the Reading portion of this multiple-choice exam.

13 Lessons in Chapter 5: FSA - Grade 7 ELA: Interpreting Literature
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Interpreting Literary Meaning: How to Use Text to Guide Your Interpretation

1. Interpreting Literary Meaning: How to Use Text to Guide Your Interpretation

In this lesson, we will discuss how to find and interpret literary meaning in writings. The lesson will focus on using the text to find key elements to guide your interpretation.

Responding to Literature: Forming Your Point of View

2. Responding to Literature: Forming Your Point of View

In order to form a supported point of view on a piece of literature, you must be able to analyze and synthesize. Watch this video lesson to learn a few ways to hone those skills.

Interpreting a Poem's Main Idea & Theme

3. Interpreting a Poem's Main Idea & Theme

Many poems have both a main idea and a theme. In this lesson, you'll learn techniques for finding both in poetry by studying a sample poem. Afterward, you can test your understanding with a short quiz.

Elements of Poetry: Rhymes & Sounds

4. Elements of Poetry: Rhymes & Sounds

Many poems rhyme, but there is often more going on in terms of the sounds of the words than just what happens at the ends of the lines. This lesson explores some of the nuances of rhyme and sound in poetry.

Elements of Poetry: Rhythm

5. Elements of Poetry: Rhythm

Poetry often has a defined beat or rhythm. In this lesson, you'll review the most common forms of poetic rhythm before diving deeper into how those rhythms influence the overall effect of the poem.

What is Historical Fiction? - Definition, Characteristics, Books & Authors

6. What is Historical Fiction? - Definition, Characteristics, Books & Authors

Learn about a genre that takes our actual past and mixes in fictional elements. This lesson breaks down the definition of historical fiction and describes popular examples in literature.

Intertextuality in Literature: Definition & Examples

7. Intertextuality in Literature: Definition & Examples

Have you ever read something that you know you've seen somewhere before? Some people might explain this as 'intertextuality,' and they wouldn't be wrong. Find out more about this idea that goes much deeper than literary deja-vu in this lesson!

How Fiction Draws on Themes from Other Works

8. How Fiction Draws on Themes from Other Works

How do classic characters like Cinderella translate for our times? In this lesson, we'll discuss theme in literature, and you'll read about an example of how authors sometimes draw on themes from already existing works to appeal to contemporary audiences.

How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

9. How to Analyze Two Texts Related by Theme or Topic

In this lesson, we will learn how to analyze two texts related by theme or topic. We will discuss how to analyze the texts individually and then how to synthesize their information.

Practice Analyzing and Interpreting a Review

10. Practice Analyzing and Interpreting a Review

We often read film and book reviews to see if the film or book is worth checking out. But to effectively analyze a review, we need to read it in a different way. This lesson shows you how to do that.

Film or Live Production vs. Text: Differences, Similarities & Analysis

11. Film or Live Production vs. Text: Differences, Similarities & Analysis

When someone takes a text or script and turns it into a play or film, it can change a great deal or only slightly. In this lesson, we'll analyze a few examples, evaluating the choices that were made.

Reading Strategies Using Visualization

12. Reading Strategies Using Visualization

In this lesson, we will define visualization. We will then discuss why this step is important, how we can visualize, and when you should visualize. Finally, we will look at a sample from a poem and practice visualizing.

What is Parallelism in Literature? - Definition & Examples

13. What is Parallelism in Literature? - Definition & Examples

Parallelism is a device used to make moments in literature memorable and alluring. Learn what makes parallelism such a powerful tool and read some famous literary examples.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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