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Ch 17: FSA - Grade 8 ELA: Collaborative Communication

About This Chapter

Your student can learn all they need to know about collaborative communication for the FSA - Grade 8 ELA. Our mostly video-based lessons are comprehensive, yet brief and engaging. The instructors are also available to answer any student questions.

FSA - Grade 8 ELA: Collaborative Communication - Chapter Summary

Relating to and communicating with other people is a major factor in life success. This chapter will take the student through hearing vs. listening, tone and attitude, and intonation cues. Other topics that are covered by the end of the chapter:

  • Leadership of classroom discussion
  • Four stages of listening
  • Listening in groups
  • Active listening
  • Agreement & disagreement
  • The main point and motivation
  • Roles of group members
  • Barriers to group listening
  • Visuals in communication

These lessons are always available for review. The videos come with written transcripts to enhance comprehension and a topic-searchable interactive video timeline. The instructors are experts in their field, and the quizzes and practice exams can show the student the kinds of questions they are likely to face on the real test.

FSA - Grade 8 ELA: Collaborative Communication - Chapter Objectives

The FSA - Grade 8 ELA is used yearly to test 8th-graders in Florida on their attainment of the Florida Standards in English language arts. The computer-based test is given in two 85-minute reading sessions and one 120-minute writing session. Questions are presented in the following formats: multiple-choice, open-response, and technology-enhanced or interactive.

13 Lessons in Chapter 17: FSA - Grade 8 ELA: Collaborative Communication
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Techniques for Leading a Classroom Discussion

1. Techniques for Leading a Classroom Discussion

Classroom discussions are a great way for students to get the most out of their time in class. This lesson will give you a few techniques to help your students get the most out of their discussions!

Hearing vs. Listening: Importance of Listening Skills for Speakers

2. Hearing vs. Listening: Importance of Listening Skills for Speakers

While often used synonymously, hearing and listening are really two very different things. Hearing is involuntary and uncontrollable. Listening, however, requires an attention.

The Four Stages of the Listening Process

3. The Four Stages of the Listening Process

As messages are sent to us, it seems as though we simply hear and react, but there is actually a process that our brains use to process the information. It begins with attending, then interpreting, responding and finally remembering the information.

Listening Effectively in Groups: Critical, Selective, Active & Empathetic Listening

4. Listening Effectively in Groups: Critical, Selective, Active & Empathetic Listening

Being an effective listener allows relationship building and leads to increased productivity in the workplace. To form an environment for effective listening, you need to know the best group sizes and the four types of effective listening.

What Is Active Listening? - Techniques, Definition & Examples

5. What Is Active Listening? - Techniques, Definition & Examples

Have you ever felt that you had been heard but not understood? If so, chances are that the person you were talking with was not actively listening.This lesson defines active listening and provides specific techniques that can be used.

Listening for Tone & Attitude

6. Listening for Tone & Attitude

When you're learning English, listening for a speaker's tone or attitude can be even harder than listening for meaning - here are some tips for how to make it work.

Listening for Agreement & Disagreement

7. Listening for Agreement & Disagreement

Listening for agreement and disagreement can be tough if English isn't your first language. Here are some tips and practice questions to help you make it work.

Listening for Intonation Cues

8. Listening for Intonation Cues

Making sense of intonation cues in spoken English can be tough, especially if it isn't your first language. To help you figure it out, here's a guide to what to listen for.

Listening for the Main Point

9. Listening for the Main Point

In this lesson, you'll get some tips on listening to a passage of spoken English for the main point. Don't get bogged down in the details; focus on what's really important!

Listening for the Motive of a Presentation's Message

10. Listening for the Motive of a Presentation's Message

A motive can sometimes be tricky to identify, particularly if the presenter doesn't want you to know what it is. Through this lesson, you will learn about some techniques for identifying the motive in a message and explore some examples of how they work.

Roles of Group Members: Perceptions, Expectations & Conflict

11. Roles of Group Members: Perceptions, Expectations & Conflict

Groups are made up of people who each have their own perceptions and expectations of the group and its work. If those perceptions and expectations are not met, conflict can arise. In this lesson, we'll identify the types of roles in groups and see the interplay of expectations, perceptions and conflict within a group.

Barriers to Effective Listening in Groups

12. Barriers to Effective Listening in Groups

Barriers to effective listening in groups can cause significant workplace issues. Selective listening and selective perception are two type of problems that can impede successful business decisions.

The Role of Visuals in Communication

13. The Role of Visuals in Communication

Visuals used in business communication can help with message development. This lesson will explain how the use of visuals can increase understanding, development, communication, and the retainment of a message.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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