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Ch 13: FSA Grade 9-10 ELA: Key Ideas in Informational Text

About This Chapter

Study up on key ideas in informational writing, so you can feel prepared when you come across these kinds of questions on the FSA Grade 9-10 ELA exam.

FSA Grade 9-10 ELA: Key Ideas in Informational Text - Chapter Summary

When writing informational text, your main priority is to communicate knowledgeable material to the reader. In this chapter, you'll review important writing skills that help you convey your information in order to prepare for the FSA Grade 9-10 ELA exam. You'll brush up on:

  • Types and characteristics of informational text
  • Drawing inferences
  • Using supporting details to explain the main idea
  • Identifying connections between general and specific ideas
  • Textual evidence and interpretation
  • Pinpointing a sequence of events
  • Establishing cause and effect

We believe the learning process should be efficient, effective and enjoyable. Most of the lessons in this chapter contain engaging videos that have been created specifically to cover material you are likely to see on the exam. As you work your way through the chapter, take self-assessment quizzes to test your knowledge. Keep track of your progress on your dashboard.

8 Lessons in Chapter 13: FSA Grade 9-10 ELA: Key Ideas in Informational Text
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Informational Text? - Definition, Characteristics & Examples

1. What is Informational Text? - Definition, Characteristics & Examples

This lesson will help you understand and identify all components of informational text. Learn more about informational text and see examples in this lesson.

Informational Text: Editorials, Articles, Speeches & More

2. Informational Text: Editorials, Articles, Speeches & More

Informational nonfiction is a large category that includes various types of writing. Learn about two of those types, articles and speeches, in this video lesson.

Drawing Inferences from Informational Texts

3. Drawing Inferences from Informational Texts

As it turns out, you may be learning more from a text than you realize. That's because in every text, some information is inferred. In this lesson, we're going to see how drawing inferences from an informational text can help us better understand it.

How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

4. How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the supporting details that explain the main idea being presented in a piece of literature. You will also learn different strategies that can be applied to future questions about the main idea.

How to Identify Relationships Between General & Specific Ideas

5. How to Identify Relationships Between General & Specific Ideas

In this lesson, we will learn how to tell the difference between general and specific ideas. We will also explore the relationships between these ideas and practice identifying the ideas and their relationships.

Textual Evidence & Interpreting an Informational Text

6. Textual Evidence & Interpreting an Informational Text

In this lesson, we will explore informational texts. Along the way, we will discover a few tips to make reading this type of text easier, and we will pay special attention to textual evidence.

Determining the Sequence of Events or Steps in a Reading Selection

7. Determining the Sequence of Events or Steps in a Reading Selection

News articles or other types of informational texts can be structured through a sequence of events or steps. In this lesson, we will examine how that is done and how to identify this structure.

How to Determine the Cause and Effect of an Event in a Passage

8. How to Determine the Cause and Effect of an Event in a Passage

Recognize and understand how cause and effect relates to literature. Learn how to determine and find cause and effect in a reading passage, along with a strategy to assist you.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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