Ch 15: FSA Grade 9-10 ELA: Understanding Informational Text

About This Chapter

Review the lessons in this chapter to make sure you fully understand informational text before taking the FSA - Grades 9-10 ELA test. Self-assessment quizzes and a chapter exam can help gauge your comprehension of this subject area.

FSA Grade 9-10 ELA: Understanding Informational Text - Chapter Summary

The process of understanding informational text can be challenging, which is why the expert instructors in this chapter provide definitions, explanations and examples to boost your knowledge. Watch entertaining videos and read short texts to ensure you're ready to do the following on the FSA - Grades 9-10 ELA test:

  • Compare information presented through different mediums
  • Recognize gaps and inconsistencies in a text
  • Explain how to evaluate sources for reliability, credibility and worth
  • Describe how to recognize statements that strengthen or weaken arguments
  • Understand an essay, improve reading comprehension and analyze structure in an informational text
  • Demonstrate your ability to interpret graphs and charts of scientific data
  • Analyze graphic information inside a text and different perspectives in historical narratives

This chapter makes it convenient for you to fit your test preparations into a busy schedule. Utilize the text and video lessons from your home computer, or access them on the go via your smartphone or tablet. Video lessons average about 10 minutes each, can be watched in any sequence, and feature timelines that let you skip to key topics without watching them in full. Take the self-assessment quizzes before, during or after watching the lessons, and submit any questions about lesson topics to our experts. Be sure to take the chapter exam to test your knowledge of information text before taking the test.

9 Lessons in Chapter 15: FSA Grade 9-10 ELA: Understanding Informational Text
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Comparing Information Presented Through Different Mediums

1. Comparing Information Presented Through Different Mediums

Different mediums, such as television, film, stage, and books, may often present the same story or the same text, but changing the medium will always inherently change the way the story is presented. This lesson uses ''Romeo and Juliet'' as an example to show how information changes when presented through new mediums.

How to Recognize Gaps & Inconsistencies in a Text

2. How to Recognize Gaps & Inconsistencies in a Text

In this lesson, we will learn how to recognize gaps and inconsistencies in nonfiction and fiction texts. We will pay special attention to gaps in arguments and informational texts.

Evaluating Sources for Reliability, Credibility, and Worth

3. Evaluating Sources for Reliability, Credibility, and Worth

It's important to have information that is reliable, credible, and worthwhile in your speech. Sometimes, it's hard to determine these factors. This lesson will help you!

How to Recognize Statements that Strengthen or Weaken Arguments

4. How to Recognize Statements that Strengthen or Weaken Arguments

In this lesson, we will learn how to recognize statements that strengthen or weaken arguments. We will pay special attention to identifying strong and weak claims, reasons, and evidence.

Get the Gist of an Essay & Improve Reading Comprehension

5. Get the Gist of an Essay & Improve Reading Comprehension

In this lesson, we learn quick rules of getting the 'gist' or point of a sentence, paragraph and essay. This skill will improve your reading speed and help you become a more effective and efficient reader and writer.

Analyzing Structure in an Informational Text

6. Analyzing Structure in an Informational Text

In this lesson, we examine several of the most common structures that an informational text might use and the different ways each structure helps an author create an argument or deliver their message.

Interpreting Graphs and Charts of Scientific Data: Practice Problems

7. Interpreting Graphs and Charts of Scientific Data: Practice Problems

Do charts and graphs make problem-solving difficult? Complex problems with visual representations can drain your brain during a test. In this lesson, learn three simple rules for solving problems with charts and graphs. We'll try them out as we walk through two sample problems.

How to Analyze Graphic Information Inside a Text

8. How to Analyze Graphic Information Inside a Text

In this lesson, we explore graphic information in texts. We will take a look at the types of graphics often seen in nonfiction, learn how to analyze them, and see how they contribute to the texts' information.

Analyzing Different Perspectives in Historical Narratives

9. Analyzing Different Perspectives in Historical Narratives

This lesson explores ways to ask questions about primary source documents. We will learn about the nineteenth-century women's rights movement. Then we will analyze three representative documents by looking at how each author presents the topic from a unique perspective.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support