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Ch 36: FTCE Social Science: The American Revolution

About This Chapter

This chapter on the American Revolution can help you get comfortable with the subject-related content you'll encounter on the FTCE Social Science exam before you take it so that you can feel confident come test day.

FTCE Social Science: The American Revolution - Chapter Summary

This chapter details the key events and figures of the American Revolution that you'll want to be familiar with going into the FTCE Social Science exam. By the time you're done going through the material, you'll have solidified and added to your knowledge of:

  • Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill
  • The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine
  • The Declaration of Independence
  • British Loyalists vs. American Patriots
  • George Washington's leadership
  • Loyalists in the southern colonies at the end of the revolution
  • The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris
  • The social and economic impact of the American Revolution

With both a video and transcript of each lesson, you'll be able to review the content in the way most conducive to your learning. Navigating through the material is a simple task either way, with the timeline feature allowing you to jump around key points of the videos. You will also notice important terms in bold throughout the transcripts highlighting important topics.

8 Lessons in Chapter 36: FTCE Social Science: The American Revolution
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

1. Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill: The American Revolution Begins

The first shots fired during the American Revolution were in Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts. Follow the action as American militias fend off the British, learn about the Battle of Bunker Hill, and meet famous historical figures.

The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

2. The Second Continental Congress and Thomas Paine's Common Sense

By 1775, a war had erupted between the colonies of America and British forces. Explore the importance of the Second Continental Congress and of Thomas Paine's pamphlet, Common Sense, in helping lead America toward independence.

The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

3. The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

The Declaration of Independence asserted the purpose of the American government, the Colonists' grievances with British rule, and signaled the newly formed country's intention to fight for democracy and self-rule. Review the declaration's text, find out who signed it, and discover the legacy of the history-changing document.

British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

4. British Loyalists vs. American Patriots During the American Revolution

During the American Revolution, colonists were split into two groups - Loyalists and Patriots. Explore the differing positions and demographics of each side, and the post-war fate of the Loyalists.

George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

5. George Washington's Leadership at Trenton, Saratoga & Valley Forge

George Washington's leadership affected the battles of Trenton and Saratoga, as well as the encampment of Valley Forge. Explore these battles and who was involved, and consider the difficulties the army experienced in Valley Forge.

Loyalists in the Southern Colonies at the End of the Revolutionary War

6. Loyalists in the Southern Colonies at the End of the Revolutionary War

In a final attempt to win the American Revolutionary War, the British implemented the Southern Strategy following their defeat at the Battle of Saratoga. Explore Britain's Southern Strategy, the key figures during this period of the war, and the significance of the Battle of Camden.

The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

7. The Battle of Yorktown and the Treaty of Paris

Explore the Treaty of Paris, officially ending the American Revolution, and how it was accomplished. Learn the roles that British General Cornwallis, the Battle of the Chesapeake, and the Battle of Yorktown played in making this happen.

American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

8. American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

The American Revolution that occurred in North America between 1765 and 1783 led to a number of social and economic changes within the United States and around the world. Explore the political effects of the Revolutionary War, the role of Joseph Brant and Andrew Jackson in the Revolution, and the economic effects of the war.

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the FTCE Social Science 6-12 (037) Study Guide & Practice Test course

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