Ch 40: FTCE Social Science: The Making of a New Nation

About This Chapter

Learn about the formation of the United States in this chapter of the FTCE Social Science exam study guide. Video lessons and self-assessment quizzes teach you all you need to know about the early years of the U.S. in preparation for the FTCE exam.

FTCE Social Science: The Making of a New Nation - Chapter Summary

Lessons in this chapter explore the formation of the U.S., including state constitutions, the Constitutional Convention, and the ratification of the Constitution. George Washington, the Federalists and the Republicans are also discussed. By the end of this chapter, you should be familiar with:

  • Creating state constitutions after the American Revolution
  • The Constitutional Convention and the Great Compromise
  • The ratification of the Constitution and the new U.S. government
  • George Washington and the new United States government
  • Hamilton and the Federalists vs. Jefferson and the Republicans
  • President John Adams

Short, engaging video lessons walk you through each subject, and knowledgeable instructors are available to answer any questions you may have. The jump feature under the Timeline tab allows you to skip directly to main subjects within the videos. Visit your dashboard to track your progress through the course.

6 Lessons in Chapter 40: FTCE Social Science: The Making of a New Nation
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Creating State Constitutions After the American Revolution

1. Creating State Constitutions After the American Revolution

After the revolution, the states had to figure out what the rule of the people would be like. The early state constitutions and how they were drafted would inform the process and the resulting document that would become the U.S. Constitution.

The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

2. The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

The Constitutional Convention was intended to amend the Articles of Confederation. Instead, those in attendance set out to found a republic (the likes of which had never been seen), which is still going strong well over 200 years later. To accomplish this task, compromises had to be made. The Great Compromise designed the bicameral congress the U.S. has today.

The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

3. The Ratification of the Constitution and the New U.S. Government

The U.S. Constitution may be one of the most important documents in history, but it wasn't a sure thing. A lot of debate took place. There were many people passionate about ratification, and many people passionate about ensuring it didn't get ratified. The divide over the Constitution shows us the root of political parties in the U.S.

George Washington and the New United States Government

4. George Washington and the New United States Government

George Washington was the United States' first president. He knew everything he did would set the stage for future presidents of the country. A heavy weight was on his shoulders, and much of what he established in his two terms set the precedent for presidents today.

Hamilton and the Federalists vs. Jefferson and the Republicans

5. Hamilton and the Federalists vs. Jefferson and the Republicans

Although President Washington warned against the nation falling into political factions, the different views of the Constitution held by Alexander Hamilton and the Federalists and Thomas Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans set the path for the two-party system that the U.S. has today.

President John Adams: From Alien and Sedition Acts to XYZ Affair

6. President John Adams: From Alien and Sedition Acts to XYZ Affair

John Adams was an important founder of the United States. In many ways, he was the voice of the Revolution. As president, he had some proud shining moments and one major blight on his legacy.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Other Chapters

Other chapters within the FTCE Social Science 6-12 (037): Practice & Study Guide course

Support