Ch 23: Fundamental Overview of World War I

About This Chapter

This chapter provides a fundamental overview of World War I to help you finish your homework or get ready to take an important exam. Review these topics using any tablet, computer or smartphone with an internet connection at your convenience 24 hours a day.

Fundamental Overview of World War I - Chapter Summary

In this chapter, our professional instructors provide an overview of World War I in a series of concise video lessons. Here you'll watch videos about subjects including the Treaty of Versailles and the timeline of the Russian Revolution. This chapter was designed to help you:

  • Detail the factors that led to World War I
  • Outline the official position of the United States in WWI
  • Explain how the war changed after America's entry into it
  • Discuss the League of Nations and the end of the war
  • Define the Peace of Paris and how it ended WWI
  • Identify the political, social and economic consequences of the Great War
  • Describe the causes and effects of the Russian Revolution

If you've struggled with these subjects before, this chapter takes the stress out of preparing for test day. The self-paced videos can be re-watched as many times as needed and navigated easily using the video tabs feature in the Timeline. Assistance from one of our experts is available through the Dashboard if you have any questions.

7 Lessons in Chapter 23: Fundamental Overview of World War I
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

1. Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

Although World War I began in Europe, it is important to take a look at World War I in relation to U.S. history as well. The U.S. was greatly affected by the war. In this lesson, we'll take a quick and direct look at the causes that led up the war and the assassination that was the final catalyst.

The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

2. The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

The United States' best option was to stay out of World War I. They had nothing to gain from getting involved. So, they tried to stay neutral, but as American interests started to lean toward the Allied Powers, many events happened to give the States the final push to enter the war.

American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

3. American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

As much as the U.S. wanted to stay neutral during World War I, it proved impossible. This meant the U.S. had to raise the forces and money to wage war. Find out how Americans played their part in WWI in this lesson.

End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

4. End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

In this lesson, we will examine the Treaty of Versailles. We will explore the treaty's negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference, take a look at the treaty's terms, and discuss Germany's reaction to the treaty.

The Peace of Paris: Ending World War I

5. The Peace of Paris: Ending World War I

In this lesson, we will learn about the end of World War I and the Peace of Paris. We will learn what events transpired to bring about the end of the war and what provisions were laid forth in the Treaty of Versailles.

Economic, Social & Political Consequences of the Great War

6. Economic, Social & Political Consequences of the Great War

In this lesson, we will explore the consequences of World War I. We will learn about the political, economic, and social impact the war had on the United States and Europe.

The Russian Revolution: Timeline, Causes & Effects

7. The Russian Revolution: Timeline, Causes & Effects

In this lesson, we will examine the Russian Revolution. We will see what events led to the revolution, and we'll learn how the revolution impacted Russia's involvement in World War I.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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