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Ch 45: GACE Behavioral Science: Gender, Aging, Power & Social Inequality

About This Chapter

Study the material of this chapter to prepare for questions on the GACE Behavioral Science exam about the forms of sexism, psychological theories of aging, social context of aging and social inequalities.

GACE Behavioral Science: Gender, Aging, Power & Social Inequality - Chapter Summary

As part of a study guide course for the Georgia Assessments for the Certification of Educators (GACE) in Behavioral Science, this chapter will help you review sex and age as they relate to social inequalities. The lessons of this chapter will also help you understand social power theories and the relationship between social inequalities and power. These lessons are taught by expert instructors who are also available to help you master the material about:

  • Forms of sexism
  • Concepts of sexual relationships and controversies of sex in society
  • Psychology of aging and the challenges of aging
  • Causes and effects of social inequalities
  • Effects of education on social inequality

These topics are thoroughly explained by experienced instructors. The lessons are animated and feature examples and narration. They're usually less than ten minutes long and they are accompanied by multiple-choice quizzes that you can use to gauge your comprehension.

GACE Behavioral Science: Gender, Aging, Power & Social Inequality Objectives

The objective of the GACE Behavioral Science is to measure prospective educators' competency in the social sciences through a series of 120 multiple-choice questions administered in two subtests. Test takers may complete these subtests in a single five-hour testing session, or in two 2.5-hour sessions. Expect 80% of the questions on the second subtest to ask you about sociology topics, including sex, gender roles, aging, power and social inequality. This chapter has been assembled to help you understand these topics with its use of video lessons, lesson transcripts and self assessment quizzes.

12 Lessons in Chapter 45: GACE Behavioral Science: Gender, Aging, Power & Social Inequality
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Sexism and Patriarchy: Definitions and Forms

1. Sexism and Patriarchy: Definitions and Forms

This lesson provides a foundation for understanding sexism in various forms. First, patriarchy versus matriarchy is defined. Then, several different forms of sexism are outlined, including old-fashioned, modern, hostile, benevolent and ambivalent.

Sexual Relationships in Society: Definitions and Concepts

2. Sexual Relationships in Society: Definitions and Concepts

Explore many types of sexual relationships, including combinations that are considered more or less acceptable in different cultures. Concepts covered in this lesson include family, incest, endogamy vs. exogamy, and different forms of marriage (e.g., monogamy, polygamy, polygyny, and polyandry).

Sexual Controversies in Society: Differing Viewpoints

3. Sexual Controversies in Society: Differing Viewpoints

Views of sexuality differ by person and by culture, which can cause difference in opinion on many sexual controversies. This lesson covers several of those debates, including teen pregnancy, birth control, pornography, and prostitution.

Sexism: Gender Differences and Contexts

4. Sexism: Gender Differences and Contexts

Sexism and gender differences can be seen in several different contexts within most modern societies. This lesson covers institutional sexism in four general areas: the workplace, family life at home, politics, and the military.

Psychosocial Theories of Aging

5. Psychosocial Theories of Aging

People approach late adulthood and the process of aging differently. In this lesson, we'll examine the three most common psychosocial theories about aging, including the disengagement, activity, and continuity theories.

Challenges of Aging: Retirement, Ageism & Social Isolation

6. Challenges of Aging: Retirement, Ageism & Social Isolation

There are many challenges that we face as we age. In this lesson, we discuss three of the larger challenges that have been identified by sociologists: retirement, ageism, and social isolation.

Theories of Aging: Structural-Functional, Symbolic-Interaction & Social-Conflict

7. Theories of Aging: Structural-Functional, Symbolic-Interaction & Social-Conflict

The process of aging can be explained and better understood through three perspectives. This lesson will cover the structural-functional, symbolic-interaction and social-conflict perspectives of aging as well as the associated theories that function within those perspectives.

Social Context of Aging: Communities, Neighborhoods, and Housing

8. Social Context of Aging: Communities, Neighborhoods, and Housing

As people age, the community around them becomes more and more important in their lives. Watch this lesson to find out about the importance of a social convoy in late life, as well as the housing options available for seniors.

Social Power Theory: Definition of Weber's Avenues to Social Power

9. Social Power Theory: Definition of Weber's Avenues to Social Power

According to prominent sociologist Max Weber, there are only three legitimate avenues to social power. This lesson will discuss the differences between charismatic authority, traditional authority, and rational-legal authority.

Social Power Theories: Pluralist, Power-Elite & Marxist Models

10. Social Power Theories: Pluralist, Power-Elite & Marxist Models

This lesson will explain and differentiate three major theories of power in society: The pluralist model, the power-elite model and the Marxist model.

What Is Social Inequality in Sociology? - Definition, Effects & Causes

11. What Is Social Inequality in Sociology? - Definition, Effects & Causes

Social inequality is the existence of unequal opportunities and rewards for different social positions or statuses within a group or society. Let's examine some causes and effects of poverty and test our knowledge with a quiz.

Impact & Role of Education on Social Inequality

12. Impact & Role of Education on Social Inequality

Schools are sometimes described as sorting machines that categorize students based on skills and interests. This process can perpetuate inequalities. This lesson explores the impact and role of education on social inequality.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the GACE Behavioral Science (550): Practice & Study Guide course

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