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Ch 40: GACE Behavioral Science: Introduction to Sociology

About This Chapter

Use this chapter to review the basic principles, applications, theoretical perspectives and key theories of sociology as you prepare for the GACE Behavioral Science test.

GACE Behavioral Science: Introduction to Sociology - Chapter Summary

Watch these video lessons for a basic overview of the theories and principles of sociology, as well as some of the key figures that came up with them. These lessons are taught by expert instructors and are mobile device compatible so that you may have an effective review whether you are at your computer or away from home. After these lessons, you should be prepared for GACE Behavioral Science test questions about:

  • Themes, applications and careers in sociology
  • Comte's three stages of society
  • Four theoretical perspectives of sociology
  • Lenski's theory of sociocultural evolution
  • Marx's theories of social class
  • Weber's theory of impersonal management
  • Durkheim's theories of functionalism, anomie and divisions of labor
  • Mill's theories about social imagination and the power elite

Test your understanding of these lessons by completing the lesson quizzes and chapter exam that accompany them. Use your assessment results to find the topics you didn't master, then use video tags to return to the locations in the video lessons that discussed them to reinforce your understanding of them. For an alternative review of the material try reading over the lesson transcripts.

10 Lessons in Chapter 40: GACE Behavioral Science: Introduction to Sociology
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What Is Sociology? - Definition, Themes & Careers in Sociology

1. What Is Sociology? - Definition, Themes & Careers in Sociology

What is sociology? This lesson covers a basic definition of the field, identifies major themes or questions studied by sociologists, and identifies possible careers in sociology. Learn about the main ideas within this popular and fascinating field!

Why Is Sociology Important? - Applications in Public Policy, Social Change & Personal Growth

2. Why Is Sociology Important? - Applications in Public Policy, Social Change & Personal Growth

How can theoretical and abstract ideas from sociology be used in the 'real world?' This lesson covers three applications of sociology. First, we'll discuss public policy, such as welfare. Second, we'll cover social change, including change in the economy, cities, and politics. Finally, sociology is applied to personal growth, including motivation and citizenship.

Comte's 3 Stages of Society & Theory of Positivism

3. Comte's 3 Stages of Society & Theory of Positivism

This lesson focuses on the theories of Auguste Comte. Specifically, Comte suggested that global society has gone through three stages, called the theological stage, the metaphysical stage, and the scientific stage. It also covers Comte's theory of 'positivism' and how science and society interact.

Sociology's Four Theoretical Perspectives: Structural-Functional, Social Conflict, Feminism & Symbolic Interactionism

4. Sociology's Four Theoretical Perspectives: Structural-Functional, Social Conflict, Feminism & Symbolic Interactionism

Theories are an essential part of the framework used to organize specific social phenomena within the social sciences. This lesson introduces the four major theoretical perspectives in sociology, including structural-functional, social conflict, feminism, and symbolic interactionism.

Gerhard Lenski's Theories of Sociocultural Evolution, Social Stratification & Technology

5. Gerhard Lenski's Theories of Sociocultural Evolution, Social Stratification & Technology

In this lesson, you will learn how Gerhard Lenski studied the amount of technology a society had and how such technology could allow a society to evolve and change. This lesson will also describe the various types of societies and their level of technology.

Karl Marx's Theories: Class Differentiation and Revolution, Socialism & Capitalism

6. Karl Marx's Theories: Class Differentiation and Revolution, Socialism & Capitalism

In this lesson, we will discuss the difference between socialism and capitalism, how Karl Marx believed that social class dictated one's social life and who were the bourgeoisie and proletariat.

Bureaucracy: Max Weber's Theory of Impersonal Management

7. Bureaucracy: Max Weber's Theory of Impersonal Management

At a time when organizations were run like families, Max Weber looked for ways to bring a more formalized structure to organizations. Weber created the idea of bureaucratic management where organizations are more authoritative, rigid and structured. This lesson will describe the development of bureaucracy and common characteristics of bureaucratic organizations.

Emile Durkheim's Theories: Functionalism, Anomie and Division of Labor

8. Emile Durkheim's Theories: Functionalism, Anomie and Division of Labor

How does a society function? This lesson will help answer this question through an exploration of Emile Durkheim's theories of functionalism, anomie, and division of labor.

Harriet Martineau: Theories and Contributions to Sociology

9. Harriet Martineau: Theories and Contributions to Sociology

In this lesson, we will look at the contributions to sociology made by Harriet Martineau. She is considered the first woman sociologist and studied many social problems of her time.

C. Wright Mills: Sociological Imagination and the Power Elite

10. C. Wright Mills: Sociological Imagination and the Power Elite

This lesson discusses the sociologist C. Wright Mills and his view on the power elite and the sociological imagination. In this lesson, you will also discover what the term sociological imagination means and how it relates to social issues.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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