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Ch 21: GACE Behavioral Science: Social Behaviors

About This Chapter

Increase the depth of your knowledge about a variety of social behaviors through reviewing this chapter. You'll find short video lessons that include info you may see on your GACE Behavioral Science assessment.

GACE Behavioral Science: Social Behaviors - Chapter Summary

While you're looking through this chapter, the planned behavior theory and misinformation effect will be among several topics you will find being discussed. Additionally, the lessons will cover these topics in preparation for the GACE Behavioral Science assessment:

  • Locus of control
  • Prosocial behavior
  • Pros and cons of group work
  • Methods of persuasion
  • Bystander effect
  • Effects of perceived control

Check out each of the videos in the chapter at your convenience using your computer or mobile device. By taking each lesson's practice quiz, you will be able to quickly determine what you know and what requires further attention.

GACE Behavioral Science: Social Behaviors Chapter Objectives

The GACE Behavioral Science assessment evaluates your knowledge of the discipline to determine your eligibility for teacher certification. When you're asked questions about social behaviors, they will be in multiple-choice format. Items dealing with this chapter will be part of the larger of the two Test I subareas, the Psychology subarea.

9 Lessons in Chapter 21: GACE Behavioral Science: Social Behaviors
Altruism and Prosocial Behavior: Definition & Predictors

1. Altruism and Prosocial Behavior: Definition & Predictors

Prosocial behavior is any action intended to help others. One motivation for prosocial behavior is altruism, or the desire to help others with no expectation of reward. In this lesson, we explore prosocial behavior and the elements that social psychologists have identified as predicting it.

Social Loafing & Social Facilitation: Definition and Effects of Groups

2. Social Loafing & Social Facilitation: Definition and Effects of Groups

Do you prefer to work in a group or by yourself? Why? Working in a group certainly has a number of advantages and disadvantages. In this lesson, we discuss three phenomena that can occur as a result of working in groups: groupthink, social loafing, and social facilitation.

Group Status, Social Loafing & Diversity in Global Groups

3. Group Status, Social Loafing & Diversity in Global Groups

Group status changes depending on culture, and as groups become more diverse, different perspectives and opinions will arise. In this lesson, we will address the issues of culture as it relates to group status, social loafing, and diversity.

Defining the Bystander Effect: Kitty Genovese Murder & Research by Latane and Darley

4. Defining the Bystander Effect: Kitty Genovese Murder & Research by Latane and Darley

In 1964, Kitty Genovese was murdered outside her New York apartment building. Some of her neighbors heard her screams but didn't call for help. This lesson explains the social phenomenon known as the bystander effect, which helps to explain why Genovese's neighbors didn't help her.

The Misinformation Effect and Eyewitness Accounts

5. The Misinformation Effect and Eyewitness Accounts

Many crimes are prosecuted on the basis of eyewitness testimony. But how accurate are eyewitness accounts? The misinformation effect and source monitoring are two psychological principles that explain how sometimes witnesses can be mistaken.

Types of Persuasion Techniques: How to Influence People

6. Types of Persuasion Techniques: How to Influence People

It's easy to underestimate just how frequently we are affected by persuasion techniques. In this lesson, we discuss four of the classics: low-balling, foot-in-the-door, door-in-the-face, and scarcity. We also define and discuss reactance theory in relation to scarcity.

Perceived Behavioral Control: Definition and Relation to Stress

7. Perceived Behavioral Control: Definition and Relation to Stress

How much control over a situation we believe we have, also called our perceived control, helps reduce stress and has many other health benefits. In this lesson, we'll look at studies that demonstrate the powerful effect perceived control can have on our health.

Self-Efficacy and Locus of Control: Definition and Meaning

8. Self-Efficacy and Locus of Control: Definition and Meaning

Self-efficacy is the belief that you can succeed in a specific area of your life, and locus of control is how much control you feel like you have over a situation. What do these two things have in common? In this lesson, we'll explore them both and how they relate to each other.

Theory of Planned Behavior: Definition, Examples & Usefulness

9. Theory of Planned Behavior: Definition, Examples & Usefulness

Most assume that our attitudes determine our behavior. However, according to the theory of planned behavior, there is more to predicting behavior than just knowing one's attitude. In this lesson, we discuss this theory and its usefulness in predicting actual behavior.

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the GACE Behavioral Science: Practice & Study Guide course

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