Ch 12: GACE Middle Grades ELA: Figures of Speech

About This Chapter

Use our lessons to refresh your understanding of figures of speech, including how to recognize them and how to use them. These videos and quizzes may help you prepare for these types of questions on the GACE Middle Grades ELA exam.

GACE Middle Grades ELA: Figures of Speech - Chapter Summary

The lessons and quizzes in this chapter offer insight into various types of figures of speech, such as cliches, paradox, symbolism and euphemism, and how to understand them and use them. Our videos explore material that will help you with the following types of questions on the GACE Middle Grades ELA exam:

  • Defining figure of speech
  • Interpreting figures of speech in context
  • Giving examples of allusion and illusion
  • Understanding cliches, paradoxes, equivocations and euphemisms
  • Explaining types of irony
  • Analyzing symbolism and imagery in literature
  • Examining the epithet in literature

These lessons go over topics that you may not have studied in a while, providing you with the review you'll need for success on the GACE Middle Grades ELA exam. You can study anytime, on your computer or mobile device. Our instructors make their lessons entertaining as well as informative, liberally using examples to illustrate what they're discussing.

9 Lessons in Chapter 12: GACE Middle Grades ELA: Figures of Speech
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What Is a Figure of Speech?

1. What Is a Figure of Speech?

In this lesson, we will define figure of speech and explain why it is important in your writing. After this definition, we will examine the more common figure of speeches and look at some examples.

Interpreting Figures of Speech in Context

2. Interpreting Figures of Speech in Context

Figures of speech can add humor or drama to any situation, but you have to understand what they mean in order to connect the dots. In this lesson, we'll discuss how to interpret figures of speech, such as verbal irony, puns, idioms, and hyperbole.

Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

3. Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

Allusions and illusions have little in common besides the fact that they sound similar. Learn the difference between the two and how allusions are an important part of literature and writing - and how to spot them in text.

Cliches, Paradoxes & Equivocations: Definitions & Examples

4. Cliches, Paradoxes & Equivocations: Definitions & Examples

Learn about cliches, paradoxes, and equivocations, and how they can weaken or strengthen certain types of writing. Explore examples of all three from literature and daily life.

Euphemism: Definition & Examples

5. Euphemism: Definition & Examples

This lesson defines euphemisms, alternate language used in place of offensive language or when discussing taboo topics. Explore some examples of euphemisms in everyday language and well-known examples from literature.

Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

6. Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

Discover, once and for all, what irony is and is not. Explore three types of irony: verbal, situational and dramatic, and learn about some famous and everyday examples.

Symbolism & Imagery in Literature: Definitions & Examples

7. Symbolism & Imagery in Literature: Definitions & Examples

In this lesson you will learn how poets and authors use symbolism in their writing to make it more meaningful and interesting. Explore how descriptive writing called imagery appeals to the senses, adding to works of literature.

Epithet in Literature: Definition & Examples

8. Epithet in Literature: Definition & Examples

Come explore the 'wine-dark' sea and meet Alexander the Great in this lesson on epithets! Keep reading to get familiar with the term and its many types, and get a chance to see these descriptors in action!

Paradox in Literature: Definition & Examples

9. Paradox in Literature: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we'll learn what a paradox is and what role they play in literature. We'll also look at several examples of paradoxes, including ones from Shakespeare, George Orwell and Joseph Heller.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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