Ch 5: GED RLA: Analyzing of Informational Texts

About This Chapter

Prepare for the GED RLA exam by watching the entertaining video lessons included in this chapter. Each lesson will teach you about an essential topic needed to properly analyze informational texts.

GED RLA: Analyzing of Informational Texts - Chapter Summary

This chapter includes videos lessons that will assist you in improving your skills in analyzing information texts so that you can succeed on the GED Reasoning through Language Arts (RLA) exam. These lessons will cover essential topics, such as:

  • Analyzing the purpose of a text
  • Analyzing the effectiveness and validity of an argument
  • Texts with two opposing arguments
  • Graphic information in a text

Our lesson instructors will go over all points you will need to know in order to improve your own analytical skills when reading informational texts. These video lessons serve as an easy and convenient means of preparing for the GED RLA exam.

10 Lessons in Chapter 5: GED RLA: Analyzing of Informational Texts
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

1. Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

To effectively write an argument, you need to know the four basic parts. In this lesson, you will learn the definitions of the four basic parts and why you need them in an argument.

How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

2. How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the theme or central idea of a text, and you'll get some specific examples of themes from famous stories.

Using Details to Support an Argument

3. Using Details to Support an Argument

This lesson will help you to be prepared to make a more comprehensive argument by including details. You'll consider what's missing from arguments without specifics and what strategies to use to improve your supporting information.

Finding Evidence in a Reading Passage: Strategies & Examples

4. Finding Evidence in a Reading Passage: Strategies & Examples

In this lesson, we will discuss a few strategies for finding evidence in a reading passage. It is important to find evidence in reading passages for the purpose of answering question prompts and supporting a claim.

How to Analyze the Purpose of a Text

5. How to Analyze the Purpose of a Text

In this lesson, we will learn how to analyze the purpose of a text. We will explore some of the primary purposes and practice determining purpose using some writing samples.

How to Analyze an Argument's Effectiveness & Validity

6. How to Analyze an Argument's Effectiveness & Validity

In this lesson, we will learn how to analyze an argument. We will pay close attention to the parts of an argument and the questions we must ask about each of those parts in order to determine the argument's effectiveness and validity.

How to Analyze Two Texts with Opposing Arguments

7. How to Analyze Two Texts with Opposing Arguments

In this lesson, we'll discuss how to analyze two texts that present opposing arguments. We'll examine arguments based on varying evidence and on varying assumptions.

How to Analyze Graphic Information Inside a Text

8. How to Analyze Graphic Information Inside a Text

In this lesson, we explore graphic information in texts. We will take a look at the types of graphics often seen in nonfiction, learn how to analyze them, and see how they contribute to the texts' information.

Detecting Assumptions in Arguments

9. Detecting Assumptions in Arguments

This lesson covers how to determine if an argument has been made based off of assumptions. It will also cover what needs to be done in order to make an argument valid. Multiple examples of assumptive argruments are provided, along with their re-structured arguments.

How to Synthesize Written Information

10. How to Synthesize Written Information

Synthesizing written information is the process of taking multiple sources and bringing them together into one cohesive idea, while bringing in a new idea or theory. This lesson explains different ways to do this effectively.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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