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Ch 4: GED Social Studies: Analysis Skills

About This Chapter

This chapter guides you through several analytical skills you'll want to be versed in when taking the GED Social Studies test. You'll review what to keep in mind when answering questions that call for these skills while looking at related examples.

GED Social Studies: Analysis Skills - Chapter Summary

The lessons in this chapter break down various analytical skills you'll want to have sharpened before tackling the GED Social Studies test. You'll go over skills that apply to the different forms of questions on this portion of the exam so you can be ready to ace this section of the test. Topics covered include working with historical content, determining fact vs. opinion in texts, the implied main idea, and all of the following:

  • Spotting cause and effect
  • Recognizing bias
  • Comparing ideas within a reading selection
  • Using context to find meaning

The practice quizzes accompanying these lessons give you the chance to test your understanding of the material subject-by-subject, with a practice final exam at the chapter's end providing a more thorough test of your comprehension. These assessments can be taken an unlimited number of times and are printable in worksheet form for offline use.

14 Lessons in Chapter 4: GED Social Studies: Analysis Skills
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Analyzing Historical Documents & Images

1. Analyzing Historical Documents & Images

In this lesson we will examine ways to analyze historical documents and images. We will learn how to place historical materials in context and determine meaning.

What are Political Cartoons? - History & Analysis

2. What are Political Cartoons? - History & Analysis

Political cartoons have a rich history that is as interesting as the cartoons are visually entertaining. In this lesson, you'll learn how political cartoons have shaped our past and continue to shape our society today, and how to analyze their messages.

Making Inductive & Deductive Inferences About a Text

3. Making Inductive & Deductive Inferences About a Text

Inductive reasoning and deductive reasoning are two often confused methods that are used to make inferences or assumptions about a text. Read on to find out the difference between these inferences and how they can be used to better understand a written work.

Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

4. Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

When someone drops hints, we're able to draw conclusions about what they're really trying to say. Similarly, as readers, we use clues to draw conclusions from texts. This lesson explains how to draw conclusions and how to teach this important skill.

Analyzing Sequence of Events in an Informational Text

5. Analyzing Sequence of Events in an Informational Text

In this lesson, you will learn how to identify the different types of sequencing of events from non-fiction, informational text. You will learn how to use context clues and make inferences about the ordering of events in a text.

Correlation vs. Causation: Differences & Definition

6. Correlation vs. Causation: Differences & Definition

When conducting experiments and analyzing data, many people often confuse the concepts of correlation and causation. In this lesson, you will learn the differences between the two and how to identify one over the other.

Identifying Cause & Effect in Historical Documents

7. Identifying Cause & Effect in Historical Documents

In this lesson, we will learn about the cause and effect surrounding important historical documents. We will examine the historical context surrounding these documents, learn why they were created, and analyze their role in history.

Determining Facts vs. Opinion in a Text

8. Determining Facts vs. Opinion in a Text

This lesson will explain how to distinguish between fact and opinion. We'll define the two terms, learn how to determine whether a statement is a fact or an opinion, and practice this skill.

Recognizing Biases, Assumptions & Stereotypes in Written Works

9. Recognizing Biases, Assumptions & Stereotypes in Written Works

In this lesson, we will define and learn how to recognize biases, assumptions and stereotypes in written works. We will also practice identifying these elements with a few writing samples.

How to Compare & Contrast Ideas in a Reading Selection

10. How to Compare & Contrast Ideas in a Reading Selection

The ability to compare and contrast the many ideas in one reading selection can be an overwhelming task. This video lesson gives a step-by-step method of how to successfully compare and contrast ideas in a reading selection.

Guidelines for Evaluating Arguments

11. Guidelines for Evaluating Arguments

When evaluating an argument, there's a lot to consider. In this lesson you'll learn some guidelines for evaluating the quality of an argument, and whether it is sound.

How to Evaluate Scientific Claims & Arguments

12. How to Evaluate Scientific Claims & Arguments

When you hear about the new scientific discovery, how can you be sure that it's true? Learn how to evaluate scientific claims and arguments, and then test your new skills with a quiz.

Logos, Ethos and Pathos: 3 Ways to Appeal to an Audience in Essays

13. Logos, Ethos and Pathos: 3 Ways to Appeal to an Audience in Essays

Appeal is an important aspect to writing, especially when your goal is to inform and/or persuade the reader in some area. In this lesson, we will examine the three main types of appeal: logos, ethos and pathos

How to Use Context to Determine the Meaning of Words

14. How to Use Context to Determine the Meaning of Words

With diligence and intrepid ingenuity, you can use context to ascertain the purport of a word. In other words, in this lesson, we'll find out how to use context to figure out what words mean.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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