Ch 2: Geologic Time Scale: Homeschool Curriculum

About This Chapter

The Geologic Time Scale unit of this AP Environmental Science Homeschool course is designed to help homeschooled students learn about the eras and eons of the geologic time scale. Parents can use the short videos to introduce topics, break up lessons and keep students engaged.

Who's it for?

This unit of our AP Environmental Science Homeschool course will benefit any student who is trying to learn about the geologic time scale's epochs and periods. There is no faster or easier way to learn about environmental science. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who require an efficient, self-paced course of study to learn about geological dating methods, such as relative and numerical dating.
  • Homeschool parents looking to spend less time preparing lessons and more time teaching.
  • Homeschool parents who need an environmental science curriculum that appeals to multiple learning types (visual or auditory).
  • Gifted students and students with learning differences.

How it works:

  • Students watch a short, fun video lesson that covers a specific unit topic.
  • Students and parents can refer to the video transcripts to reinforce learning.
  • Short quizzes and a geologic time scale unit exam confirm understanding or identify any topics that require review.

Geologic Time Scale Unit Objectives:

  • Discover theories of geological evolution.
  • Learn about radiometric dating principles.
  • Explore fossil preservation conditions.
  • Compare uniformitarianism and catastrophism.
  • Learn about the law of superposition and relative dating.

8 Lessons in Chapter 2: Geologic Time Scale: Homeschool Curriculum
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Geologic Time Scale: Major Eons, Eras, Periods and Epochs

1. Geologic Time Scale: Major Eons, Eras, Periods and Epochs

The Geologic Time Scale is a record of the planet's history told through layers in rocks, known as strata. Discover the use of strata in the concept of timeline divisions and learn about eons, eras, periods, and epochs.

Theories of Geological Evolution: Catastrophism vs Uniformitarianism

2. Theories of Geological Evolution: Catastrophism vs Uniformitarianism

Catastrophism, a theory of the Earth's development posited by the naturalist Georges Cuvier, proposed that Earth's history was the result of frequent geological catastrophes. Later, the geologist James Hutton proposed instead that the Earth was formed by gradual change over long periods of time, a theory called uniformitarianism. Explore the origins of these two geological theories, and how they affected our modern understanding of the Earth.

Methods of Geological Dating: Numerical and Relative Dating

3. Methods of Geological Dating: Numerical and Relative Dating

Scientists use a combination of relative and numerical dating to establish the age of rocks and fossils. Explore these two methods and learn how each one works.

What is Relative Dating? - Law of Superposition, Principles of Original Horizontality & Cross-Cutting Relationships

4. What is Relative Dating? - Law of Superposition, Principles of Original Horizontality & Cross-Cutting Relationships

Unlike its cousin numerical dating, relative dating cannot identify the actual age of a rock, but it can determine if a rock is older or younger than another rock. Explore the nuances of relative dating, and discover related concepts, such as the principle of original horizontality, the law of superposition, cross-cutting relationships, inclusions, and uniformities.

Principles of Radiometric Dating

5. Principles of Radiometric Dating

Radiometric dating is a process used to determine the age of the Earth's rocks and other geological materials, such as carbon. Learn about the principles of radiometric dating and understand its processes by studying radioactive decay, parent and daughter nuclides, and types of decay.

Radiometric Dating: Methods, Uses & the Significance of Half-Life

6. Radiometric Dating: Methods, Uses & the Significance of Half-Life

Scientists use a process called radiometric dating to help determine the age of rocks and other objects. This lesson explains that process, defines important terms such as half-life, and investigates some of the different methods of radiometric dating.

Conditions of Fossil Preservation: Rapid Burial, Hard Parts & the Elements

7. Conditions of Fossil Preservation: Rapid Burial, Hard Parts & the Elements

Fossil preservation occurs when the minerals in an organism's remains turn to rock or leave an imprint in sedimentary stone. Learn how rapid burial, the organism's hard parts, and the elements contributed to the conditions necessary for the fossil preservation of prehistoric life.

Relative Dating with Fossils: Index Fossils as Indicators of Time

8. Relative Dating with Fossils: Index Fossils as Indicators of Time

Relative dating with fossils is a method of dating in which scientists use index fossils from plants or animals that existed for a short period of time to determine the relative ages of rocks. Learn about relative dating, fossil succession, and how index fossils can be used as accurate indicators of time.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken
More Exams
There are even more practice exams available in Geologic Time Scale: Homeschool Curriculum.

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 220 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Support