Ch 23: Glencoe Chemistry - Matter And Change Chapter 23: The Chemistry of Life

About This Chapter

The Chemistry of Life chapter of this Glencoe Chemistry - Matter and Change textbook companion course helps students learn essential lessons on the chemistry of life. Each of these simple and fun video lessons is about five minutes long and is sequenced to align with the Chemistry of Life textbook chapter.

How it works:

  • Identify the lessons in the Glencoe Chemistry - Chemistry of Life chapter with which you need help.
  • Find the corresponding video lessons within this companion course chapter.
  • Watch fun videos that cover the chemistry of life topics you need to learn or review.
  • Complete the quizzes to test your understanding.
  • If you need additional help, rewatch the videos until you've mastered the material or submit a question for one of our instructors.

Students will learn:

  • Structure and function of proteins
  • Characteristics of amino acids
  • Carbohydrate function and structure
  • Structure and function of lipids
  • Chemical structure of nucleic acids and phosphodiester bonds
  • Anabolism and catabolism
  • Cellular respiration
  • Lactic acid and alcoholic fermentation

Glencoe Chemistry is a registered trademark of McGraw-Hill Education, which is not affiliated with Study.com.

13 Lessons in Chapter 23: Glencoe Chemistry - Matter And Change Chapter 23: The Chemistry of Life
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Proteins I: Structure and Function

1. Proteins I: Structure and Function

We need our proteins, not just as a major food group but for the many useful roles that they play in our bodies. In our introductory lesson to proteins, you'll learn about the many functions we rely on them to perform.

Proteins II: Amino Acids, Polymerization and Peptide Bonds

2. Proteins II: Amino Acids, Polymerization and Peptide Bonds

In this lesson, we'll take a deeper look at amino acids. You'll learn what makes a peptide, and what separates a protein from other kinds of amino acid bonds.

Proteins III: Structure and Characteristics of the 20 Amino Acids

3. Proteins III: Structure and Characteristics of the 20 Amino Acids

How do amino acids form the intricate polypeptide chains found in proteins? It's a matter of chemistry. Join glycine, a special amino acid, as she sizes up the other amino acids.

Proteins IV: Primary, Secondary, Tertiary and Quaternary Structure

4. Proteins IV: Primary, Secondary, Tertiary and Quaternary Structure

How is progressing through higher order protein structures like crafting an essay? In this lesson, you'll explore everything from quaternary structures to denaturation as we show how the different structures are intertwined.

Structure and Function of Carbohydrates

5. Structure and Function of Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are found in many foods that we eat and may be found as sugars, starches, or fiber. Learn more about these three distinct types of carbohydrates, and how they are distinguished through their chemical structures in this lesson.

Structure and Function of Lipids

6. Structure and Function of Lipids

Molecules called lipids have long hydrocarbon chains that determine the way they act. They can be fats, oils, or hormones, and even exist in our cell membranes. Learn more about the chemical structure and biological function of various lipids in this lesson.

DNA: Chemical Structure of Nucleic Acids & Phosphodiester Bonds

7. DNA: Chemical Structure of Nucleic Acids & Phosphodiester Bonds

In this lesson, you'll discover what nucleotides look like and how they come together to form polynucleotides. We'll also explore nucleic acids and focus on DNA in particular.

DNA: Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, Thymine & Complementary Base Pairing

8. DNA: Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, Thymine & Complementary Base Pairing

Learn the language of nucleotides as we look at the nitrogenous bases adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine. Armed with this knowledge, you'll also see why DNA strands must run in opposite directions.

DNA: Discovery, Facts, Structure & Function in Heredity

9. DNA: Discovery, Facts, Structure & Function in Heredity

This lesson will help you to navigate the twists and turns of DNA's structure. We'll also clue you in on the amazing discoveries that put this nucleic acid in the limelight as the molecule of heredity.

Anabolism and Catabolism: Definitions & Examples

10. Anabolism and Catabolism: Definitions & Examples

Metabolism breaks down large molecules like food into usable energy. This energy drives bodily processes critical to survival. In this video lesson, you will learn about the two forms of metabolism that break down and build up molecules and see examples of each.

Cellular Respiration: Energy Transfer in Cells

11. Cellular Respiration: Energy Transfer in Cells

Watch this short video to learn the basics about converting organic compounds into ATP, also known as cellular respiration. We'll look at an overview of the process.

Lactic Acid & Alcoholic Fermentation: Comparison, Contrast & Examples

12. Lactic Acid & Alcoholic Fermentation: Comparison, Contrast & Examples

When in an anaerobic environment, some cells can use glycolysis and fermentation to keep producing ATP. Lactic acid fermentation happens in our muscle cells when we are exercising feverishly, while alcoholic fermentation is used in yeast cells and is what leads to beer, bread, and wine.

Energy and Life: The Transformation of Energy in Living Organisms

13. Energy and Life: The Transformation of Energy in Living Organisms

While the sun is an excellent source of energy, not all forms of life can utilize the sun's energy directly. This lesson describes how plants transform the sun's energy into potential energy stored in sugar, how living organisms utilize energy in sugar to perform work, and how the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular respiration is necessary for life.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Other Chapters

Other chapters within the Glencoe Chemistry - Matter And Change: Online Textbook Help course

Support