Ch 2: Conventions in Writing: Usage

About This Chapter

Watch college composition video lessons and learn the important points of writing clear, concise and readable pieces. Each lesson is accompanied by a short multiple-choice quiz you can use to check your understanding of these topics.

Conventions in Writing: Usage - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

Good writing is about more than having an amazing storyline or a solid point of view backed by great facts. To write well, you also need to understand some basic concepts, like tone, voice and sentence structure. These lessons cover those topics, along with helping you understand the characteristics of good writing. In this chapter, you'll learn to do the following:

  • Write with good diction to develop style, tone and point-of-view.
  • Write clear sentences.
  • Write with idioms or phrasal verbs.
  • Write logical sentences and avoid faulty comparisons.
  • Avoid mixed structure sentences.

VideoObjective
How to Write with Good Diction to Develop Style, Tone & Point-of-ViewLearn how word choice helps you develop style, tone and point-of-view for your audience.
How to Write Well: What Makes Writing Good?Get an overview of what makes good writing tick.
How to Write with Idioms or Phrasal VerbsLearn to use idioms, also known as phrasal verbs, in your writing.
Active and Passive VoiceExplore when to use active and passive voice.
How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty ComparisonsLearn how failures in logical sentence construction can render a sentence nonsensical, even it if looks right at first glance.
Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear SentencesLearn to order information, use active voice and avoid multiple negatives, and get other tips on clear sentence construction.
Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' SentencesLearn to identify and avoid sentences that start off being structured one way and switch to a different structure halfway through.

8 Lessons in Chapter 2: Conventions in Writing: Usage
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Write Well: What Makes Writing Good?

1. How to Write Well: What Makes Writing Good?

There isn't a specific answer to what makes writing good, but you can take some things into consideration to improve your writing. Learn how to write well by coming up with great ideas, using specific examples, giving organization and clarity to your ideas, giving your writings a good style and voice, and being careful with your spelling, punctuation, and grammar to prevent readers from distracting.

How to Write With Good Diction to Develop Style, Tone & Point-of-View

2. How to Write With Good Diction to Develop Style, Tone & Point-of-View

Proper word choice can change the feel of a piece of writing as interesting, specific, and unique words can set the tone and establish the ways characters think for the reader. Learn how to write with good diction to develop style and tone and point-of-view.

Active and Passive Voice

3. Active and Passive Voice

Structural improvements can add more clarity and impact to sentences like 'The Emperor was thrown down a ventilation shaft by Luke's dad.' Learn how to identify active and passive voice and correct passive sentences to make them active.

Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

4. Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

A point of view is defined as the perspective that a work--such as a dialogue--is written. Learn about the differences between the first, second, and third point of view, and how to properly use and identify them in writing.

How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

5. How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

When used incorrectly, comparisons between two things can become faulty. Learn how to write logical sentences and avoid faulty comparisons like illogical comparison errors, no comparison errors, and misused comparatives and superlatives.

What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

6. What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

Argumentative writing must be as logical as possible, while faulty reasoning can lead to flawed arguments. Learn how to define, identify, and avoid logical fallacies like broad generalizations and non-sequiturs.

Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

7. Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

Having sentence clarity in your writing is key to create great essays. Learn how to write clear sentences, discover why you should pay attention to the rhythm of your writings, and look at the clear sentence checklist to turn odd ones into great ones.

Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

8. Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

Authors may accidentally change the structure of a sentence halfway through, creating a mixed sentence structure error. Learn about the rules of sentence structure and discover how to identify, correct, and avoid writing sentences with mixed structures.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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