Copyright

Ch 1: Grammar & Usage: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.1

About This Chapter

Find lessons for eleventh and twelfth grade English. The following lessons meet the Common Core Language standard for demonstrating Standard American English grammar and usage (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.1).

Standard: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

About This Chapter

Students who have mastered this standard will be able to analyze and identify grammar and usage techniques used in Standard American English texts or speeches. After mastering this standard, students are also able to construct easy-to-understand and thoughtful writings.

Lessons in this standard cover concepts such as:

  • Writing parallel sentences
  • Understanding usage as a matter of convention that can be changed over time
  • Resolving contested usage
  • How to avoid case shifts
  • Using reflexive, relative, possessive and interrogative pronouns
  • Identifying different types of clauses and phrases

Students demonstrate mastery of this standard when writing or speaking with correct Standard American English. Students who have mastered this standard may also excel in situations where proper Standard American English grammar and usage is needed, such as job interviews and public speaking.

How to Use These Lessons in Your Classroom

Here are some tips for how to use these lessons to support instruction in the ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.1 standard:

Pronoun Identification and Use Lessons

Construct a worksheet that has examples of sentences that use various types of pronouns. Have the class watch the video lessons that cover pronoun identification and use. Pass out the worksheet and have the class identify the types of pronoun use within each sentence according to concepts learned from the video lessons. Following a discussion on why each answer is correct, instruct the class to come up with their own sentences that demonstrate the different types of pronoun use.

Parallel Sentence Lessons

Show the class the video lesson 'Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences.' Display incorrect parallel sentences in front of the class. Call on students to correct the incorrect parallel sentences. Follow up with the students on why each change was made.

Understanding Clauses and Phrases Lessons

Before class, develop a worksheet with several sentences that contain clauses and/or phrases. Exhibit the video lesson that identifies the usage of clauses and phrases. After giving the worksheet to the students, tell them to circle the clauses and underline the phrases. Underneath each sentence, have the students describe the clause and/or phrase types used. Hold a class discussion that covers correct answer explanations.

9 Lessons in Chapter 1: Grammar & Usage: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.1
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is a Clause?

1. What is a Clause?

In this lesson, we will define what a clause is. We will then look at the different types of clauses, define each of the types, provide some examples of each, and then discuss why they are important in our writing.

What is a Phrase?

2. What is a Phrase?

In this lesson, we will define a phrase. We will then discuss the different kinds of phrases, look at examples of each, and then discuss how to use them correctly in writing.

Types of Clauses: Noun, Adverbial, & Relative Clauses

3. Types of Clauses: Noun, Adverbial, & Relative Clauses

In this lesson, we will define clause. We will then review independent and dependent clauses. Finally, we will focus on the different types of dependent clauses - including relative, noun and adverbial - discuss how to recognize them and then discuss how to use the clauses in our writing.

Types of Phrases: Gerund, Participial, Prepositional & More

4. Types of Phrases: Gerund, Participial, Prepositional & More

The writing of a sentence begins with a phrase. In this lesson, we will discuss the definition of a phrase, the different types of phrases, and how knowing what a phrase is will improve your writing.

Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

5. Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

Sentences that aren't parallel sound funny, even if they look perfectly correct at first glance. Learn what makes a sentence parallel, how to revise a sentence to make it parallel, and how to write beautiful, balanced sentences of your own.

Independent & Dependent Clauses: Subordination & Coordination

6. Independent & Dependent Clauses: Subordination & Coordination

This lesson is about independent and dependent clauses, and how they make up a sentence. Dependent clauses, like the name suggests, rely on other elements in a sentence. Independent clauses, on the other hand, can stand alone. Learn more in this lesson.

What Are Personal Pronouns?

7. What Are Personal Pronouns?

Pronouns are great for making sure debaters don't have to keep repeating the other guy's name over and over again, but they have many other uses too! In fact, pronouns, you could say, make reading readable. In part one, we'll cover personal pronouns and how they're used before moving on to more esoteric varieties.

Pronouns: Relative, Reflexive, Interrogative & Possessive

8. Pronouns: Relative, Reflexive, Interrogative & Possessive

In this lesson, we'll look at relative, reflexive, interrogative and possessive pronouns. We'll do this by antagonizing our friend Gary with the whos, whats, whoms, and whichevers that make up these pronouns.

Standard American English: Usage & Language Conventions

9. Standard American English: Usage & Language Conventions

If you are learning English, it is useful to know what kind of English to focus on. After all, we speak differently than people in the United Kingdom. This lesson focuses on Standard American English, the most popular English in the U.S.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Support