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Ch 3: GRE Analytical Writing - Crafting Your Argument: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The GRE Analytical Writing: Crafting Your Argument chapter of this GRE Prep Help and Review course is the simplest way to master crafting an argument. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of crafting an argument.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering GRE material will benefit from taking this course. You will be able to grasp the subject matter faster, retain critical knowledge longer and earn better grades. You're in the right place if you:

  • Have fallen behind in understanding how to craft an argument and write for an audience
  • Need an efficient way to learn to craft an argument
  • Learn best with engaging auditory and visual tools
  • Struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Experience difficulty understanding your teachers
  • Missed class time and need to catch up
  • Can't access extra GRE analytical writing resources at school

How it works:

  • Start at the beginning, or identify the topics that you need help with.
  • Watch and learn from fun videos, reviewing as needed.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Submit questions to one of our instructors for personalized support if you need extra help.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the chapter exam on crafting an argument.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the crafting an argument chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any question about crafting your argument. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

In this chapter, you'll learn the answer to questions including:

  • How do I evaluate reasoning?
  • Why is it important to focus an essay?
  • What are the steps to write a strong personal essay?
  • How can I engage readers by developing an appeal?
  • How do I structure an argument in an essay?
  • What processes are key when writing for an audience?
  • How do I refute opposing views in an essay?
  • How can I write logical sentences?
  • What are some ways to avoid faulty comparisons and logical fallacies?

10 Lessons in Chapter 3: GRE Analytical Writing - Crafting Your Argument: Help and Review
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Evaluate Reasoning

1. How to Evaluate Reasoning

A critical analysis includes the evaluation of a written document's reasoning. Learn the steps to evaluate an author's reasoning fairly regardless of position in an argument and to understand how to use tools such as inductive and deductive validity in the process.

How to Focus Your Essay and Respond to the Essay Prompt

2. How to Focus Your Essay and Respond to the Essay Prompt

Some essays, such as academic papers, are written in response to an essay prompt. Learn how to identify an essay prompt's key terms and prepare an organized outline of an essay focused to appropriately respond to the essay prompt and explore techniques for refocusing an essay veering off-topic while writing it.

How to Write a Strong Personal Essay

3. How to Write a Strong Personal Essay

There are many reasons to write a personal essay in academic settings and the best ones have a clear purpose. Learn how to write a strong personal essay by identifying your purpose, narrowing your scope, editing your ideas, and not meandering.

How to Engage Readers by Picking and Developing an Appeal

4. How to Engage Readers by Picking and Developing an Appeal

Persuasive writing seeks to appeal to readers and sway their perspectives. Learn about the three types of appeals--logical, ethical, and emotional--and explore how to engage readers by picking the appropriate type of appeal and developing an effective argument for the appeal.

How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

5. How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

Some essays are used to argue a perspective and persuade an audience. Learn how to structure and organize an argument in an essay and recognize the components needed to create a strong argument.

Writing for Your Audience

6. Writing for Your Audience

To be effective, essays and other documents should be written to appeal to their target audience. Learn how to write for an audience by considering fundamental characteristics such as positions, perspectives, and knowledge of the most likely readers.

Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

7. Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

Regardless of how well an essay is written, some members of an audience likely will oppose the author's arguments. Learn how to write essays that have strong arguments, anticipate audience opposition, and address and refute opposing views.

How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

8. How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

When used incorrectly, comparisons between two things can become faulty. Learn how to write logical sentences and avoid faulty comparisons like illogical comparison errors, no comparison errors, and misused comparatives and superlatives.

What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

9. What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

Argumentative writing must be as logical as possible, while faulty reasoning can lead to flawed arguments. Learn how to define, identify, and avoid logical fallacies like broad generalizations and non-sequiturs.

What is Logic? - Definition & Examples

10. What is Logic? - Definition & Examples

Logic is the use of data to develop rational conclusions. Learn the definitions of multiple types of logic, discover the differences between inductive and deductive reasoning, and explore examples of logical fallacies.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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