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Ch 6: GRE Analytical Writing: Crafting Your Argument

About This Chapter

Review the elements of crafting an argument to prepare for the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). Video lessons and quizzes incorporate concepts used in the GRE's analytical writing section in a simple and clear manner.

GRE Analytical Writing: Crafting Your Argument - Chapter Summary

Discover how to prepare and express your position in response to an essay prompt with our GRE training lessons. These videos discuss concepts and strategies related to developing your argument and assessing others' to help you perform effectively on the GRE's analytical writing segment. Topics covered in this chapter include:

  • Assessing reasoning
  • Outline usage
  • Thesis statements
  • Essay types
  • Logical fallacies

These lessons offer instruction in using supporting evidence to develop and present written arguments in a timed environment. In addition, they cover scenarios to avoid, such as making flawed comparisons or addressing the wrong audience. The chapter lessons are presented in concise video format to make them easy to follow, and corresponding quizzes can help you assess how well you understand the information.

GRE Analytical Writing Objectives

The GRE is designed to assess students' readiness to undertake graduate-level study. In the analytical writing portion of the test, which comprises about 30% of the total GRE, two essay prompts are separately administered and timed. The lessons on crafting an argument address considerations you're likely to encounter when taking this part of the test. Lessons offer specific instruction in:

  • Creating an outline to help focus an essay
  • Understanding and developing different kinds of persuasive appeals
  • Tailoring writing to the intended audience
  • Foreseeing and countering opposing perspectives
  • Eschewing flawed logic and erroneous comparisons
  • Examining arguments to determine validity

The GRE's analytical writing section includes a prompt asking you to produce a position paper in favor or not in favor of a statement, as well as another prompt requesting that you evaluate the assertions of an already-outlined position. Each task is allotted 30 minutes to complete.

10 Lessons in Chapter 6: GRE Analytical Writing: Crafting Your Argument
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Evaluate Reasoning

1. How to Evaluate Reasoning

Evaluating reasoning in an essay or article is an important step in critical analysis. Being able to judge if something is reasonable whether or not you agree with the argument will be our learning focus for this video.

How to Focus Your Essay and Respond to the Essay Prompt

2. How to Focus Your Essay and Respond to the Essay Prompt

In this video, learn how to ensure that your writing responds directly to your assignment. Then find out how to spot where you may have strayed from the paper's point and how to get back on track.

How to Write a Strong Personal Essay

3. How to Write a Strong Personal Essay

At some point, you may be required to write a personal essay. Watch this video to learn how to turn your personal experiences into an effective essay.

How to Engage Readers by Picking and Developing an Appeal

4. How to Engage Readers by Picking and Developing an Appeal

There are three types of appeals that you can use in your persuasive writing to make your arguments more effective. In this video, you'll learn about logical, ethical, and emotional appeals as well as how to use them.

How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

5. How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

When you write a persuasive essay, it's important to think about how you'll construct your argument, from how you'll arrange your major points to how and where you'll refute opposing views. This video covers some of the basics for structuring an argument.

Writing for Your Audience

6. Writing for Your Audience

By understanding some fundamental characteristics about your audience, you can write more effectively and be in better control of how well your writing is received by that audience. This video explains the basic points that you should consider in order to provide more informative and more persuasive essays for your readers.

How to Recognize Statements that Strengthen or Weaken Arguments

7. How to Recognize Statements that Strengthen or Weaken Arguments

In this lesson, we will learn how to recognize statements that strengthen or weaken arguments. We will pay special attention to identifying strong and weak claims, reasons, and evidence.

Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

8. Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

In addition to planning the major argumentative points you'll make when writing a persuasive paper, you should also think about potential opposing views. This video gives you tips for determining how to effectively anticipate and refute opposing views as you write your argument.

How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

9. How to Write Logical Sentences and Avoid Faulty Comparisons

Your sentences may not always make as much sense as you think they do, especially if you're comparing two or more things. It's easy to let comparisons become illogical, incomplete, or ambiguous. Learn how to avoid making faulty comparisons on your way to writing a great essay.

What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

10. What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

Logical fallacies are flaws in reasoning that can throw your argument off track and confuse your reader. This video explains how to identify a few common logical fallacies and how to steer clear of them.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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