Ch 12: GRE Analytical Writing: Writing Stronger Sentences

About This Chapter

Review the elements of writing stronger sentences to prepare for the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). Video lessons and quizzes incorporate concepts used in the GRE's analytical writing section in a simple and clear manner.

GRE Analytical Writing: Writing Stronger Sentences - Chapter Summary

Use our GRE practice lessons to learn how to strengthen your sentence-writing skills in preparation for the analytical writing section of the test. Video lessons on writing stronger sentences teach about:

  • Sentence structure
  • Types of sentences
  • Sentence construction errors
  • Parallelism

This chapter's lessons incorporate information about different kinds of sentences, and it also shows how to adjust your writing according with specific considerations, like audience and tone. Corresponding quizzes give you the opportunity to test your comprehension of the subject matter. The brief, focused nature of these videos can help you learn a variety of subjects in bite-sized segments to support your GRE success.

GRE Analytical Writing Objectives

The GRE is a test meant to determine students' readiness for business or graduate school. The analytical writing section of the GRE accounts for around 30% of the total exam and encompasses a pair of timed writing tasks. Our tutorials on writing stronger sentences can help you refine your writing capacities and lead to success on the GRE. Particular subjects covered in these lessons are:

  • Understanding and enhancing sentence structure
  • Knowing sentence types and discerning which kind to use
  • Attuning to audience, purpose, and appropriate tone in writing
  • Employing parallelism in sentence construction
  • Avoiding and correcting mixed-structure sentences

In the GRE's analytical writing section, students are given a position prompt and asked to provide evidence supporting their perspective in favor of or opposition to it. In addition, a second prompt requires students to compose an essay analyzing the strength of a presented argument. Students are allowed 30 minutes to complete each task.

9 Lessons in Chapter 12: GRE Analytical Writing: Writing Stronger Sentences
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Structure Sentences in an Essay

1. How to Structure Sentences in an Essay

Sometimes we know what we want to write, but we are just unsure of the best way to write it. In this video, we will cover ways to structure sentences in an essay.

How to Write Better by Improving Your Sentence Structure

2. How to Write Better by Improving Your Sentence Structure

Often times in writing, we know what we want to say, but it doesn't seem to come out right. In this video we will learn the steps needed to improve your writing with better sentence structure.

Using Rhetorical Skills to Write Better Essays

3. Using Rhetorical Skills to Write Better Essays

In this video, you will explore the basics of identifying your purpose and audience and learn how to use effective rhetorical skills in your persuasive writing.

Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

4. Sentence Structure: Identify and Avoid 'Mixed Structure' Sentences

A mixed structure sentence is a common error that occurs when a writer starts a sentence with one structure but switches to a different structure in the middle of the sentence. This video will teach you how to spot and avoid this type of error.

Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

5. Sentence Clarity: How to Write Clear Sentences

Just because you know a good sentence when you read one doesn't mean that you think it's easy to put one together - forget about writing an essay's worth. Learn how to write clear sentences and turn rough ones into gems.

How to Write and Use Transition Sentences

6. How to Write and Use Transition Sentences

Like a road map, transitions guide readers through your essay. This lesson examines the way writers transition between sentences, within paragraphs and between paragraphs to make for a smooth reading experience.

Sentence Agreement: Avoiding Faulty Collective Ownership

7. Sentence Agreement: Avoiding Faulty Collective Ownership

A common error occurs whenever a writer uses wording that suggests that a lot of people own or use just one thing, when really they all own or use their own separate things. This video will explain how to identify and fix this type of error.

Sentence Fragments, Comma Splices and Run-on Sentences

8. Sentence Fragments, Comma Splices and Run-on Sentences

Sentence fragments, comma splices, and run-on sentences are grammatical and stylistic bugs that can seriously derail an otherwise polished academic paper. Learn how to identify and eliminate these errors in your own writing here.

Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

9. Parallelism: How to Write and Identify Parallel Sentences

Sentences that aren't parallel sound funny, even if they look perfectly correct at first glance. Learn what makes a sentence parallel, how to revise a sentence to make it parallel, and how to write beautiful, balanced sentences of your own.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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