Ch 3: GRE Verbal Reasoning: Reading Skills

About This Chapter

If you're preparing for the verbal reasoning section of the GRE, this chapter's fun lessons and mini quizzes can help you excel! Get up to speed with the basics of reading skills, and ensure you're ready for the exam in a short amount of time.

GRE Verbal Reasoning: Reading Skills - Chapter Summary

The verbal reasoning section of the GRE tests your ability to evaluate written passages and analyze them. By studying this entertaining chapter, you can build a quality understanding of the analysis of text structure, reading strategies that use visualization, how to draw inferences from informational texts, failure of a hypothesis and more. After studying the lessons, you will be ready to:

  • Describe an essay and ways to improve reading comprehension
  • Define and share examples of connotation and denotation
  • Differentiate between close reading and big picture reading strategies
  • Determine the number of main ideas in a text
  • Explain the main point through supporting details
  • Draw conclusions from a passage
  • Determine the writer's tone and point-of-view
  • Find specific details in a reading selection and restate an idea

This chapter's self-paced format makes it easy to study for the GRE Verbal Reasoning exam in a manner that suits your unique needs and schedule. Access the lessons anytime using any computer or mobile device; feel free to send any questions you have to our subject-matter experts. Before exam day, be sure to take our short quizzes and practice exam to ensure you're ready to excel.

13 Lessons in Chapter 3: GRE Verbal Reasoning: Reading Skills
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Determine the Number of Main Ideas in a Text

1. How to Determine the Number of Main Ideas in a Text

When approaching a text for the first time, the reader is likely looking for the main idea, or the central point the author is trying to emphasize or explain. Read this lesson to learn how to find what the main idea is and how to tell if there is more than one.

How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

2. How to Explain the Main Point through Supporting Details

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the supporting details that explain the main idea being presented in a piece of literature. You will also learn different strategies that can be applied to future questions about the main idea.

Drawing Inferences from Informational Texts

3. Drawing Inferences from Informational Texts

As it turns out, you may be learning more from a text than you realize. That's because in every text, some information is inferred. In this lesson, we're going to see how drawing inferences from an informational text can help us better understand it.

Get the Gist of an Essay & Improve Reading Comprehension

4. Get the Gist of an Essay & Improve Reading Comprehension

In this lesson, we learn quick rules of getting the 'gist' or point of a sentence, paragraph and essay. This skill will improve your reading speed and help you become a more effective and efficient reader and writer.

How to Draw Conclusions from a Passage

5. How to Draw Conclusions from a Passage

You might be able to understand everything the author says in a passage, but can you figure out what the author ISN'T saying? Try your hand at drawing conclusions - but not jumping to conclusions - in this video lesson.

How to Determine the Writer's Tone and Point-of-View

6. How to Determine the Writer's Tone and Point-of-View

Writers give us many clues to help us understand why they write. In this lesson, we're going to check out the concepts of tone and point of view to see how they can be used to better understand a passage.

Failure of a Hypothesis: Alternative Explanations for Evidence

7. Failure of a Hypothesis: Alternative Explanations for Evidence

Sometimes, an experiment will show that the hypothesis in a scientific experiment is incorrect. This lesson will help you understand what that means and what you can do about it.

Reading Strategies Using Visualization

8. Reading Strategies Using Visualization

In this lesson, we will define visualization. We will then discuss why this step is important, how we can visualize, and when you should visualize. Finally, we will look at a sample from a poem and practice visualizing.

What Are Connotation and Denotation? - Definitions & Examples

9. What Are Connotation and Denotation? - Definitions & Examples

Discover the difference between a word's denotation and its connotation in this lesson. Explore how authors use both denotation and connotation to add layers of meaning to their work with some literary examples.

How to Identify & Analyze Text Structure

10. How to Identify & Analyze Text Structure

Understanding the organization of a piece of writing is imperative to gain a full understanding of the author's message. In this lesson, we'll learn how to identify and analyze several common text structures.

Finding Specific Details in a Reading Selection

11. Finding Specific Details in a Reading Selection

Ever have trouble finding a specific detail in a reading selection? Often knowing the structure of the selection will help. This video lesson will give some strategies for finding specific details depending on selection structure.

Close Reading vs. Big Picture Reading Strategies

12. Close Reading vs. Big Picture Reading Strategies

In this lesson, learn about two different approaches to reading a work of literature: big picture strategies and close reading strategies. Discover how these two perspectives can be put into practice through examples from the play 'Romeo and Juliet.'

How to Restate an Idea and Summarize

13. How to Restate an Idea and Summarize

Understanding how to restate an idea and summarize the information you have read is an important reading skill. In this lesson, you'll learn how to rephrase the main points of an essay, argument, or reading passage into a clear summary.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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