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Ch 9: Harlem Renaissance Literature Lesson Plans

About This Chapter

The Harlem Renaissance Literature chapter of this course is designed to help you plan and teach about the history and the social impact of this literary movement in your classroom. The video lessons, quizzes and transcripts can easily be adapted to provide your lesson plans with engaging and dynamic educational content. Make planning your course easier by using our syllabus as a guide.

Weekly Syllabus

Below is a sample breakdown of the Harlem Renaissance Literature chapter into a 5-day school week. Based on the pace of your course, you may need to adapt the lesson plan to fit your needs.

Day Topics Key Terms and Concepts Covered
Monday Poetry and literature in the age of jazz Define the Harlem Renaissance, analyze how the movement started, and review how the movement affected the concept of American identity
Tuesday W.E.B. Du Bois Study Du Bois' history, identify his relationship to The Crisis and the NAACP, and discuss how The Negro influenced society
Wednesday Countee Cullen Examine Heritage and determine the type of role that Cullen took on during the Harlem Renaissance
Thursday Zora Neale Hurston Build an analysis of Their Eyes Were Watching God and identify how the novel portrayed African American society during this era
Friday Langston Hughes and Claude McKay Review the poetic concept of similes in relationship to Langston Hughes' poem 'Harlem,' investigate Claude McKay's poem 'America' and identify how it describes African American culture, and review how these poets participated in this literary movement

6 Lessons in Chapter 9: Harlem Renaissance Literature Lesson Plans
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The Harlem Renaissance: Novels and Poetry from the Jazz Age

1. The Harlem Renaissance: Novels and Poetry from the Jazz Age

The Harlem Renaissance was a movement in the 1920s and 1930s during which there was an explosion of African-American art and literature. This lesson looks at the themes, causes, and important figures of the Harlem Renaissance.

Countee Cullen's Role in the Harlem Renaissance: An Analysis of Heritage

2. Countee Cullen's Role in the Harlem Renaissance: An Analysis of Heritage

The Harlem Renaissance exposed the world to everyone from W.E.B. DuBois to Ella Fitzgerald. In this lesson, we'll explore one of the movement's most iconic and resonant poems, Countee Cullen's 'Heritage.'

Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God: Summary & Analysis

3. Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God: Summary & Analysis

Zora Neale Hurston's novel 'Their Eyes Were Watching God' is a famous Harlem Renaissance novel that examines race and gender issues through the eyes of its main character, Janie Crawford. This lesson gives a synopsis of the novel and examines how it approaches race and gender.

Langston Hughes & the Harlem Renaissance: Poems of the Jazz Age

4. Langston Hughes & the Harlem Renaissance: Poems of the Jazz Age

Langston Hughes was a popular poet from the Harlem Renaissance. His Jazz Age poems, including 'Harlem' and 'I, Too, Sing America,' discussed the racism facing African Americans in the 1920s and '30s.

Claude McKay: Role in Harlem Renaissance & 'America' Analysis

5. Claude McKay: Role in Harlem Renaissance & 'America' Analysis

Claude McKay was an influential Harlem Renaissance poet. His poems 'America' and 'If We Must Die' explored the complicated relationship African Americans had with the world around them.

W.E.B. Du Bois: Theories, Accomplishments & Double Consciousness

6. W.E.B. Du Bois: Theories, Accomplishments & Double Consciousness

W.E.B. Du Bois was an important figure in American civil rights history, and his idea of the double consciousness delved into what it felt like to live as a black person in a white people's world. Learn more about his life and works in this lesson.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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