Ch 1: HESI Admission Assessment Exam: Reading Comprehension

About This Chapter

The HESI Admission Assessment contains a section on reading comprehension that tests your ability to grasp a section of text and analyze it. This chapter reviews the essentials of interpreting reading material to help you prepare for this nursing school admission test.

HESI Admission Assessment Exam: Reading Comprehension - Chapter Summary

You can use the lessons in this chapter to help you refresh yourself on reading comprehension, ways to improve comprehension and strategies for grasping the gist of an essay. Additional subjects covered here include topic sentences; supporting details; and constructing meaning with word structure, context clues and prior knowledge. These videos also help you prepare for the HESI Admission Assessment Exam by covering connotation and denotation and interpreting works in context. After you finish this chapter, you should be ready to:

  • Give a definition and examples of inference
  • Explain what persuasive text is
  • Recognize bias, assumptions and stereotypes in written works
  • Discuss how to find the theme or central idea
  • Cite textual evidence to support analysis
  • Define author's purpose and give examples
  • Make inductive and deductive inferences about a text
  • Draw conclusions from a reading selection

These lessons help you learn to read between the lines, which will put you in a great position to score highly on the Reading Comprehension portion of the HESI Admission Assessment. The bold terms in the transcript below each video also help emphasize the concepts you want to review. The dashboard lets you submit questions to one of our experts if you need help.

15 Lessons in Chapter 1: HESI Admission Assessment Exam: Reading Comprehension
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Reading Comprehension?

1. What is Reading Comprehension?

When you are reading, it isn't enough to just process the words. You need to understand what you are reading, too. In this lesson, you'll learn about the steps involved in reading comprehension.

Get the Gist of an Essay & Improve Reading Comprehension

2. Get the Gist of an Essay & Improve Reading Comprehension

In this lesson, we learn quick rules of getting the 'gist' or point of a sentence, paragraph and essay. This skill will improve your reading speed and help you become a more effective and efficient reader and writer.

Topic Sentences: Identification & Analysis

3. Topic Sentences: Identification & Analysis

The topic sentence is a very important structure in written language. This lesson not only defines this term, but gives tips on how to analyze your own topic sentences in order to make them as strong as can be.

Supporting Details: Definition & Examples

4. Supporting Details: Definition & Examples

Find out what supporting details are and their role in essay writing. Learn the different ways to include supporting details, then take a quiz to test your new skills.

Constructing Meaning with Context Clues, Prior Knowledge & Word Structure

5. Constructing Meaning with Context Clues, Prior Knowledge & Word Structure

In this lesson, you will learn how readers use prior knowledge, context clues and word structure to aid their understanding of what they read. Explore these strategies through examples from literature and everyday life.

What Are Connotation and Denotation? - Definitions & Examples

6. What Are Connotation and Denotation? - Definitions & Examples

Discover the difference between a word's denotation and its connotation in this lesson. Explore how authors use both denotation and connotation to add layers of meaning to their work with some literary examples.

Interpreting Works in Context

7. Interpreting Works in Context

In this lesson, we will learn how to interpret a written work in its context. We will explore the historical context, biographical context, context of language and form, and context of the reader.

What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

8. What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

In this lesson, we will define the terms inference and intended meaning. We will then discuss what steps to take when making inferences in literature.

What is Persuasive Text? - Definition & Examples

9. What is Persuasive Text? - Definition & Examples

This lesson will teach you how to identify all components of persuasive writing. You'll learn more about informational texts and test your understanding through a brief quiz.

Recognizing Biases, Assumptions & Stereotypes in Written Works

10. Recognizing Biases, Assumptions & Stereotypes in Written Works

In this lesson, we will define and learn how to recognize biases, assumptions and stereotypes in written works. We will also practice identifying these elements with a few writing samples.

How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

11. How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the theme or central idea of a text, and you'll get some specific examples of themes from famous stories.

Citing Textual Evidence to Support Analysis

12. Citing Textual Evidence to Support Analysis

In this lesson, we're going to learn how to analyze a text and cite evidence to support an analysis. We'll also learn the difference between quotations, paraphrases, and summaries, and we'll talk about how to give credit where credit is due.

Author's Purpose: Definition & Examples

13. Author's Purpose: Definition & Examples

This lesson explains the purpose behind various types of writing. In addition, author's purpose is defined using examples to illustrate the explanations.

Making Inductive & Deductive Inferences About a Text

14. Making Inductive & Deductive Inferences About a Text

Inductive reasoning and deductive reasoning are two often confused methods that are used to make inferences or assumptions about a text. Read on to find out the difference between these inferences and how they can be used to better understand a written work.

Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

15. Drawing Conclusions from a Reading Selection

When someone drops hints, we're able to draw conclusions about what they're really trying to say. Similarly, as readers, we use clues to draw conclusions from texts. This lesson explains how to draw conclusions and how to teach this important skill.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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