Ch 4: HiSET: American Literature - Literary Analysis

About This Chapter

Get ready for the reading portion of the HiSET Language Arts exam by watching our informative videos on American literature. The lessons in this chapter review popular works by Irving, Longfellow, Dickinson and more.

American Literature: Literary Analysis - Chapter Summary

The lessons in this chapter cover the process of analyzing literary works by several renowned American authors. Brush up on techniques for reading and interpreting themes, style and symbolism and more through chapters on:

  • Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
  • Longfellow's poems
  • Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter
  • Poems by Emily Dickinson
  • Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby
  • Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men

The videos included in this course are taught by experienced instructors and include fun examples and illustrations to present their points. There are also lesson transcripts, multiple-choice quizzes and an end-of-chapter test available to help you test your knowledge of concepts you'll need to be familiar with on test day.

HiSET Language Arts - Reading Objectives

The HiSET is a high school equivalency exam that several states offer in addition to the GED. The test is divided into five subtests: language arts - reading, language arts - writing, science, math and social studies. The reading test is 65 minutes long and includes 40 multiple-choice questions that test your ability to read a passage and understand the information in it. Approximately 60% of the passages included on this test are literary texts, which may include the authors covered in this chapter. Prepare for these questions by watching our video lessons on the steps for reading and analyzing written texts by American authors.

7 Lessons in Chapter 4: HiSET: American Literature - Literary Analysis
Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow: Summary and Analysis

1. Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow: Summary and Analysis

Everyone loves a scary story now and then. Learn how Washington Irving's famous story, ''The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,'' uses imagination and the supernatural to make it a Romantic piece of American literature that is still adapted by television today.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: Poem Analysis

2. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: Poem Analysis

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was known as a fireside poet because his poems were read by the fire as a means of entertainment. Learn about how he created American history through the use of musical elements, like rhythm and rhyme scheme.

The Scarlet Letter: Summary and Analysis of an Allegory

3. The Scarlet Letter: Summary and Analysis of an Allegory

See how Nathaniel Hawthorne uses allegory and symbolism to illustrate the affair and resulting guilt between a minister and a Puritan woman in his novel 'The Scarlet Letter.'

Emily Dickinson: Poems and Poetry Analysis

4. Emily Dickinson: Poems and Poetry Analysis

Emily Dickinson was a well-known poet of the mid-1800s whose numerous works have stood the test of time. But what in the world did her poems really mean? In this video, we'll explore one of her most recognized pieces and analyze its meaning and purpose.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Themes and Analysis

5. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Themes and Analysis

In this lesson, we will continue our exploration of Mark Twain's most acclaimed work, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, through an analysis of plot, characters, and theme.

The Great Gatsby: Summary, Themes, Symbols, and Character

6. The Great Gatsby: Summary, Themes, Symbols, and Character

F. Scott Fitzgerald's 'The Great Gatsby' is considered by many critics to be the greatest American novel. Watch our video lesson on the novel to find out why!

Of Mice and Men: Summary and Analysis of Steinbeck's Style

7. Of Mice and Men: Summary and Analysis of Steinbeck's Style

John Steinbeck's 'Of Mice and Men' is one of the most enduring American stories of friendship. Watch this video lesson to learn about its characters, main plot events and key themes.

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