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Ch 3: HiSET: Literary Analysis

About This Chapter

Learn the step-by-step process of analyzing a literary passage while you prepare for the language arts-reading subtest of the HiSET. Video lessons and quizzes show you all of the elements of literary analysis in a way that is easy to understand and follow.

HiSET Literary Analysis - Chapter Summary

Master all the aspects of analyzing a literary passage in English by using our effective and fun lessons. These short video lessons cover identifying literary motifs, finding the central theme, interpreting meaning and more in a creative way that makes learning fun. Lessons in this chapter include:

  • Literary meaning and motifs
  • Locating the theme and analyzing theme development
  • Author's purpose and point of view
  • Evaluating reasoning
  • Facts, opinions and assumptions
  • Narrators
  • Tone and mood, irony and foreshadowing
  • Argument structure
  • Logical fallacies and rhetorical devices

The lessons in this chapter review all of the elements of analyzing literature in English and include practice questions and quizzes so you can check your comprehension of the topics. Each element is broken down into easy-to-follow video lessons that will ensure you understand how to analyze a literary passage.

HiSET Literary Analysis Objectives

The HiSET is a high-school equivalency exam that tests your knowledge of high-school level academics. The Language Arts - Reading portion of the exam consists of 40 multiple-choice items that measure your ability to understand, analyze and interpret many different kinds of literary and informational texts. About 60% of the subtest focuses on literary texts, and is where you'll be asked to analyze various literary works.

The Language Arts - Reading portion of the HiSET exam presents you with passages of text followed by a series of questions about the passages.

18 Lessons in Chapter 3: HiSET: Literary Analysis
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

1. How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

In this lesson, we will examine the steps involved in the basic analysis of literature. Then, using a well-known fable, we will go through each step of analysis: comprehension, interpreting and drawing conclusions.

Interpreting Literary Meaning: How to Use Text to Guide Your Interpretation

2. Interpreting Literary Meaning: How to Use Text to Guide Your Interpretation

In this lesson, we will discuss how to find and interpret literary meaning in writings. The lesson will focus on using the text to find key elements to guide your interpretation.

How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

3. How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the theme or central idea of a text, and you'll get some specific examples of themes from famous stories.

What Are Literary Motifs? - Definition & Examples

4. What Are Literary Motifs? - Definition & Examples

In this lesson, you will learn about how writers use themes in works of literature as a way to explore universal ideas like love and war. You will also explore motifs, or repeating objects and ideas, which can contribute to theme.

Analyzing Theme Development in a Text: Characters, Setting & Plot

5. Analyzing Theme Development in a Text: Characters, Setting & Plot

Once you can identify the plot, setting, characters, and theme of a story, there's still more to consider. In this lesson, you'll get a sense of how all four of those terms function together to have an effect on the reader.

Author's Purpose: Definition & Examples

6. Author's Purpose: Definition & Examples

This lesson explains the purpose behind various types of writing. In addition, author's purpose is defined using examples to illustrate the explanations.

Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

7. Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

Just who is telling this story? In this lesson, we'll look at point of view, or the perspective from which a work is told. We'll review first person, second person and third person points of view.

How to Evaluate Reasoning

8. How to Evaluate Reasoning

Evaluating reasoning in an essay or article is an important step in critical analysis. Being able to judge if something is reasonable whether or not you agree with the argument will be our learning focus for this video.

Narrators in Literature: Types and Definitions

9. Narrators in Literature: Types and Definitions

Learn how point of view, or the angle from which a story is told, impacts the narrative voice of a work of literature. Explore, through examples, how point of view can be limited, objective, or omniscient.

Structure in Literature: Definition & Examples

10. Structure in Literature: Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we will learn exactly what is meant by structure of literature. Some common methods of organization are provided. The main focus will explore the narrative structure of literature, using the popular story of Cinderella to help understand the various elements associated with this structure.

Understanding Tone and Mood in a Reading Passage

11. Understanding Tone and Mood in a Reading Passage

In this lesson, we will define the literary terms tone and mood. We will then discuss how to identify each of them, as well as how to identify them in small reading passages.

Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

12. Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

Discover, once and for all, what irony is and is not. Explore three types of irony: verbal, situational and dramatic, and learn about some famous and everyday examples.

What is Foreshadowing? - Types, Examples & Definitions

13. What is Foreshadowing? - Types, Examples & Definitions

Learn about how authors use foreshadowing, both subtle and direct, as part of their storytelling process. Explore many examples of foreshadowing, from classical plays to contemporary stories.

How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

14. How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

When you write a persuasive essay, it's important to think about how you'll construct your argument, from how you'll arrange your major points to how and where you'll refute opposing views. This video covers some of the basics for structuring an argument.

Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

15. Audience Opposition: Anticipating and Refuting Opposing Views in Your Essays

In addition to planning the major argumentative points you'll make when writing a persuasive paper, you should also think about potential opposing views. This video gives you tips for determining how to effectively anticipate and refute opposing views as you write your argument.

Logos, Ethos and Pathos: 3 Ways to Appeal to an Audience in Essays

16. Logos, Ethos and Pathos: 3 Ways to Appeal to an Audience in Essays

Appeal is an important aspect to writing, especially when your goal is to inform and/or persuade the reader in some area. In this lesson, we will examine the three main types of appeal: logos, ethos and pathos

What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

17. What are Logical Fallacies? - Define, Identify and Avoid Them

Logical fallacies are flaws in reasoning that can throw your argument off track and confuse your reader. This video explains how to identify a few common logical fallacies and how to steer clear of them.

Rhetorical Device: Definition & Examples

18. Rhetorical Device: Definition & Examples

Rhetorical devices are used in language to communicate effectively and persuade. Here you'll discover more about rhetorical devices and learn how to put some of them to use in some persuasion of your own.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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