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Ch 6: HiSET: Organizing Ideas in an Essay

About This Chapter

Get ready for the essay portion of the HiSET Language Arts - Writing exam by watching our informative videos. The lessons in this chapter review the steps to organizing your ideas into a well-structured essay.

Organizing Ideas in an Essay - Chapter Summary

Use this chapter to review the concepts for organizing your ideas into a thoughtful, informative text. The lessons are designed to prepare you for the essay portion of the HiSET Language Arts test through topics such as:

  • Developing the theme
  • Supporting details
  • Organizing ideas
  • Structuring arguments
  • Editing content
  • Structure in writing

These topics are covered within short video lessons that you can view on your own time. The lessons also include multiple-choice quizzes and practice questions that help prepare you for the essay on the exam and improve your writing abilities.

HiSET Language Arts - Writing Objectives

The HiSET exam is offered in place of the GED high school equivalency exam in several states. It includes tests in five subject areas, including writing. The Language Arts - Writing exam includes two parts: a multiple-choice test and an essay. During the essay portion, you are given a topic and have 45 minutes to write an original essay in response to a question. The essay is evaluated on your ability to generate and organize ideas in writing. Lessons in this chapter have been created to help you prepare for writing developing ideas and writing an effective essay.

8 Lessons in Chapter 6: HiSET: Organizing Ideas in an Essay
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

1. How to Find the Theme or Central Idea

In this lesson, you'll learn how to identify the theme or central idea of a text, and you'll get some specific examples of themes from famous stories.

Supporting Details: Definition & Examples

2. Supporting Details: Definition & Examples

Find out what supporting details are and their role in essay writing. Learn the different ways to include supporting details, then take a quiz to test your new skills.

How to Use Descriptive Details & Sensory Language in Your Writing

3. How to Use Descriptive Details & Sensory Language in Your Writing

When you write a narrative, you can draw your reader into your experiences by adding specific, concrete details to your storytelling. This lesson tells you exactly how to do it.

Organizing and Categorizing Ideas, Concepts and Information

4. Organizing and Categorizing Ideas, Concepts and Information

In this lesson, you will learn clear, simple ways to group your ideas together. First, you'll figure out what the paper is about, and then the rest is easy!

How to Organize an Essay

5. How to Organize an Essay

In this video, we will cover the steps involved in organizing an essay. We'll talk about titles, introductory paragraphs, concluding paragraphs, main points, transition statements and editing.

How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

6. How to Structure an Argument in Your Essay

When you write a persuasive essay, it's important to think about how you'll construct your argument, from how you'll arrange your major points to how and where you'll refute opposing views. This video covers some of the basics for structuring an argument.

How to Edit and Improve Essay Content

7. How to Edit and Improve Essay Content

Going back through an essay that you've written in order to make substantive content improvements can be a daunting task. Fortunately, there are some basic principles that you can apply to whip your essay into shape.

What is Structure in Writing and How Does it Affect Meaning?

8. What is Structure in Writing and How Does it Affect Meaning?

In this lesson, we will define the role of structure in literature. From there, we will look at the different ways to structure fiction and how it affects the meaning.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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